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Belgian federal election, 2010

 

Belgian federal election, 2010

Belgian federal election, 2010
Belgium
width="" colspan=4 |
2007 ←
13 June 2010 (2010-06-13)
→ 2014
width="" colspan=4 |

width="" colspan = 4 style="text-align: center" | All 150 seats in the Chamber of Representatives
76 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Bart De Wever
Leader Bart De Wever Elio Di Rupo Didier Reynders
Party N-VA PS
Leader since 2004 1999 2004
Leader's seat Antwerp Mons Liège
Last election * 20 seats, 10.86% 23 seats, 11.41%
Seats before * 20 23
Seats won 27 26 18
Seat change Increase* Increase6 Decrease5
Popular vote 1,135,617 894,543 605.617
Percentage 17.4% 13.70% 9.28%
Swing Increase* Increase2.85 Decrease2.85

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
 
Leader Marianne Thyssen Caroline Gennez Alexander De Croo
Party CD&V sp.a Open VLD
Leader since 2008 2007 2009
Leader's seat Oud-Heverlee Mechelen Brakel
Last election 30 seats, 18.51% * 14 seats, 10.26% 18 seats, 11.83%
Seats before 30* 14 18
Seats won 17 13 13
Seat change Decrease13* Decrease1 Decrease5
Popular vote 707,986 602.867 563.873
Percentage 10.85% 9.24% 8.64%
Swing Decrease7.66* Decrease1.02 Decrease3.19
width="" style="text-align: center" colspan=4 |

width="" colspan=4 style="text-align: center" | Colours denote the winning party, as shown in the main table of results

* CD&V and N-VA were in a Cartel during the 2007 election; results shown for CD&V were for both parties during the 2007 election.

width="" colspan=4 |
Prime Minister before election

Yves Leterme
CD&V

Prime Minister

Elio Di Rupo
PS

Elections for the Federal Parliament were held in Belgium on 13 June 2010.[1] After the fall of the previous Leterme II Government over the withdrawal of Open Flemish Liberals and Democrats (Open VLD) from the government the King dissolved the legislature and called new elections. The New Flemish Alliance, led by Bart De Wever, emerged as the plurality party with 27 seats, just one more than the francophone Socialist Party, led by Elio Di Rupo, which was the largest party in the Wallonia region and Brussels.[2]

Background

Fall of the government

Following a continued lack of agreement over how to resolve the conflict over the electoral arrondissement of Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde, the liberal Open VLD left the government on 22 April 2010, continuing the 2007–2011 Belgian political crisis. Prime Minister Yves Leterme (Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams, CD&V) immediately offered his resignation to King Albert II, who accepted it on 26 April 2010. Following the elections held on 13 June, there were fears that coalition-building may take so long that Belgium's presidency of the Council of the European Union, which starts on 1 July 2010, might have to start under a caretaker government.[3][4][5]

Constitutionality of elections

According to a statement by the Flemish President of the Constitutional Court, Marc Bossuyt, the elections might be ruled unconstitutional unless the Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde arrondissement is split up beforehand.[6][7][8][9][10] On 4 May, all but one Flemish judge-president of the 13 Flemish Courts of First Instance wrote a collective letter, saying that the elections cannot be held with the current electoral districts and that a return to the previous electoral arrondissements is necessary.[11] In contrast, Ghislain Londers, the president of the Court of Cassation declared that all judges are obliged to cooperate with the electoral process. Before the judges' letters, former president of the Belgian Chamber of Representatives Herman De Croo stated that no court could prevent the elections from taking place.[10]

Importance of elections

The international media saw the election as crucial to determine the future of the country, even though it was admitted that devolution would not happen immediately.[12][13]

Parties


Flemish parties (Dutch speaking)

These Flemish parties field candidates in the regions of Flanders and the partially bilingual electoral district Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde.

Walloon parties (French speaking)

These Francophone parties fielded candidates in the region of Wallonia and in the electoral district Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde.

Candidates

Leterme stepped aside on 28 April 2010 and was replaced as leader of CD&V by Marianne Thyssen.[14]

Notable newcomers in politics:

Polls

As of May 26, it appeared that the major development in the election was the surge in popularity of the N-VA in Flanders. Led by Bart De Wever, it supports eventual independence for Flanders, and an immediate switch from a federal Belgium to a confederal Belgium. The N-VA replaces the CD&V of outgoing PM Yves Leterme as the most popular party in Flanders. This development opens the question of how the francophone parties might react to forming a government with an openly sovereigntist, but politically centrist party if they do win a plurality of votes in Flanders. It appeared that the N-VA had attracted some popularity from the ethnic nationalist party, Vlaams Belang.[16]

Flemish constituency Francophone constituency
Date Source CD&V N-VA Open VLD SP–A VB Groen! LDD PS MRFDF CDH Ecolo FN PP RWF
10 June 2007 2007 election 29.6% 18.8% 16.3% 19.0% 6.3% 6.5% 29.5% 31.2% 15.8% 12.8% 5.6% / /
29 March 2010 La Libre Belgique [17] 20.0% 17.8% 13.8% 15.5% 17.3% 8.1% 5.5% 31.7% 20.5% 15.5% 20.2% / 4.3% /
4 May 2010 l'Avenir[18] 18.9% 22.9% 14.8% 14.2% 12.5% 7.9% 3.9% 32.5% 21.1% 18.2% 17.6% 2.9% <1% 2.0%
26 May 2010 Dimarso [19] 19.5% 26.0% 12.4% 16.0% 10.3% 7.8% 5.4%
28 May 2010 l'Avenir [20] 33.0% 20.4% 17.0% 17.6% 2.5% 1.9% 1.9%
4 June 2010 Standaard/VRT [21] 19.0% 25.2% 13.9% 13.8% 11.5% 8.2% 6.2%
June 2010 La Libre Belgique [22] 16.2% 26% 13.6% 16.3% 15% 6.8% 4.3% 30% 20.2% 16.1% 18.9% 4.1% 4.1% /

Results

After polls showed the N-VA receiving 29% of votes in their region, media interpreted the election as a "victory for Flemish independence."[23] The following tables contain percentages on the national level (i.e. the result of N-VA is 17.4% on the national level, while it is 27.8% on the regional level).

Chamber of Representatives


e • d Summary of the 13 June 2010 Belgian Chamber of Representatives election results
← 200720102014 →
Abbr. Party Leader(s) Votes  % +/– E.c. % Seats +/–
N-VA New Flemish Alliance Bart De Wever 1,135,617 17.40 * 28.2 27 *
PS Socialist Party Elio Di Rupo 894,543 13.70 2.85 Increase 35.7 26 6 Increase
CD&V Christian Democratic & Flemish Wouter Beke 707,986 10.85 * 17.6 17 *
MR Reformist Movement Charles Michel 605,617 9.28 3.23 Decrease 24.2 18 5 Decrease
SP.A Socialist Party – Differently Bruno Tobback 602,867 9.24 1.02 Decrease 15.0 13 1 Decrease
OPEN VLD Open Flemish Liberals and Democrats Alexander De Croo 563,873 8.64 3.19 Decrease 14.0 13 5 Decrease
VB Flemish Interest Bruno Valkeniers 506,697 7.76 4.23 Decrease 12.6 12 5 Decrease
CDH Humanist Democratic Centre Benoît Lutgen 360,441 5.52 0.53 Decrease 14.4 9 1 Decrease
ECOLO Ecology Party Jean-Michel Javaux
and Sarah Turine
313,047 4.80 0.30 Decrease 12.5 8 0 Steady
GROEN! Green! Wouter Van Besien 285,989 4.38 0.40 Increase 7.1 5 1 Increase
LDD List Dedecker Jean-Marie Dedecker 150,577 2.31 1.72 Decrease 3.7 1 4 Decrease
PP Popular Party Mischaël Modrikamen 84,005 1.29 new 3.4 1 new
PVDA+/PTB+ Workers' Party+ Peter Mertens 101,088 1.60 0.80 Increase 0
Others (parties that received less than 1% of the national vote) 316,108 4.84
Valid votes 6,527,367 94.19
Blank and invalid votes 402,488 5.81
Totals 6,929,855 100.00 150
Electorate and voter turnout 7,767,552 89.22
Source: Federal Portal − Chamber Elections 2010.

Notes:
1) E.c. = electoral college (Dutch- and French-speaking),
2) * = Christian Democratic and Flemish and the New Flemish Alliance contested the 2007 elections together, receiving 18.51% of the votes and 30 seats.

Details

Results by party (seats)
Region Seats won per party Total seats
Constituency N-VA CD&V SP.A VLD VB GROEN! LDD
Flanders Antwerp N/A
B.H.V. N/A N/A
East Flanders N/A
Leuven N/A
Limburg N/A N/A
West Flanders
Total
PS MR CDH ECOLO PP
Wallonia B.H.V. N/A
Hainaut N/A
Liège N/A
Luxembourg N/A N/A
Namur N/A
Walloon Brabant N/A
Total
Results by electoral constituencies (percentages)

Dutch-speaking

Electoral constituency N-VA CD&V SP.A VLD VB GROEN! LDD Others
Antwerp (province) Antwerp 30.71 15.53 14.32 11.03 16.15 7.69 2.29 2.28
East Flanders East Flanders 28.15 15.40 14.15 17.40 12.33 7.36 3.19 2.04
Belgium Leuven 27.05 16.26 17.79 14.51 9.61 9.79 3.14 1.86
Limburg (Belgium) Limburg 28.83 18.81 18.14 12.10 12.79 4.81 2.89 1.62
West Flanders West Flanders 23.89 23.01 15.13 13.53 9.07 6.31 7.67 1.27

French-speaking

Electoral constituency PS MR CDH ECOLO PP Others
Hainaut (province) Hainaut 48.18 17.52 11.47 9.41 2.75 10.67
Liège (province) Liège 35.79 22.30 13.93 13.83 3.08 11.07
Luxembourg (Belgium) Luxembourg 28.49 19.54 31.41 11.71 2.44 6.41
Namur (province) Namur 32.20 24.65 15.92 13.38 3.12 10.73
Walloon Brabant Walloon Brabant 22.48 35.79 12.89 16.33 5.04 7.47

Dutch- and French-speaking

Electoral constituency MR PS N-VA CDH ECOLO VLD CD&V VB SP.A Others
Belgium Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde 19.17 16.74 12.23 8.07 7.99 7.17 6.94 5.03 4.64 12.01

Senate

e • d Summary of the 13 June 2010 Belgian Senate election results
Parties Senate
Votes +/−  % +/− Seats +/−
New Flemish Alliance (Nieuw-Vlaamse Alliantie) 1,268,780 * 19.61% * 9 *
Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste) 880,828 Increase202,016 13.62% Increase3.37% 7 Increase3
Christian Democratic and Flemish (Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams) 646,375 * 9.99% * 4 *
Socialist Party – Differently (Socialistische Partij – Anders) 613,079 Decrease52,251 9.48% Decrease0.54% 4 Steady 0
Reformist Movement (Mouvement Réformateur) 599,618 Decrease216,137 9.27% Decrease3.04% 4 Decrease2
Open Flemish Liberals and Democrats (Vlaamse Liberalen en Democraten) 533,124 Decrease288,809 8.24% Decrease4.16% 4 Decrease1
Flemish Interest (Vlaams Belang) 491,547 Decrease296,263 7.60% Decrease4.29% 3 Decrease2
Ecolo 353,111 Decrease32,355 5.46% Decrease0.36% 2 Steady 0
Humanist Democratic Centre (Centre Démocrate Humaniste) 331,870 Decrease58,982 5.13% Decrease0.77% 2 Steady 0
Green! (Groen!) 251,546 Increase10,454 3.89% Increase0.25% 1 Steady0
List Dedecker (Lijst Dedecker) 130,779 Decrease93,215 2.02% Decrease1.36% 0 Decrease1
Workers' Party of Belgium (Partij van de Arbeid van België, Parti du Travail de Belgique) 105,060 Increase50,253 1.60% Increase0.80%
Popular Party (Parti Populaire) 98,858 1.53% 0
Others 269,588 4.17%
Total 6,469,304 100.00% 40
Source: Federal Portal − Senate Elections 2010.

Notes: * Christian Democratic and Flemish and the New Flemish Alliance contested the 2007 elections together, receiving 19.42% of the votes and 9 seats.

Chamber of Representatives (geographically)

These maps depict the largest party in each constituency.

Dutch-speaking constituencies


Legend:

  •     MR

Brussels, French- & German-speaking constituencies


Legend:

Most popular candidates

Candidates receiving the highest number of preferential votes.

For the Senate:[24]
  • 785,776 votes (19.63% of the Dutch electoral college) for Bart De Wever,
  • 322,540 votes (8.06% of the Dutch electoral college) for Marianne Thyssen,
  • 301,917 votes (7.54% of the Dutch electoral college) for Alexander De Croo,
  • 264,167 votes (10.71% of the French electoral college) for Paul Magnette,
  • 200.024 votes (5.00% of the Dutch electoral college) for Filip Dewinter,
For the Chamber:[25]
  • 203,758 votes (28.19% of the constituency of Hainaut) for Elio Di Rupo,
  • 101,940 votes (10.67% of the constituency of East-Flanders) for Siegfried Bracke,
  • 101,830 votes (12.97% of the constituency of West-Flanders) for Yves Leterme,
  • 78.951 votes (7.20% of the constituency of Antwerp) for Inge Vervotte,
  • 72.194 votes (11.92% of the Constituency of Liège) for Michel Daerden,

Government formation

Main article: 2010–2011 Belgian government formation

On possible coalitions, election winner Bart De Wever announced he would seek negotiations with the Francophone Socialist Party.[26] The Socialist Party leader Elio di Rupo was tapped to become the next Prime Minister, because the socialist parties emerged as the largest "party family" in the elections, and because the New Flemish Alliance lacks a Francophone counterpart.[27][28][29]

Philip Blenkinsop of Reuters stated that the win of the New Flemish Alliance could have negative effects because "Belgium can ill afford drawn-out coalition talks because it has a large debt and any policy paralysis could make the country vulnerable on financial markets that are closely watching a sovereign debt crisis."[30]

Coalition formation continued for a record breaking 541 days, with a government under Elio De Rupo eventually being formed on 6 December 2011 after agreement was reached on the 2012 budget. The Di Rupo I Government includes the Liberal, Socialist and Christian Democratic parties from both Flanders and Wallonia. The government excludes the New Flemish Alliance (N-VA), the Greens of Groen and Ecolo, the right of Vlaams Belang, the Lijst Dedecker and the People's Party. N-VA's absence, together with the unwillingness of Open Vld to enter into an eight-party coalition that included the green parties, means the government coalition lacks a majority in the Dutch language group. It is the first time that the Belgian prime minister has been openly gay and the world's first male openly gay head of government[31] Belgium is thus the second European country to have a homosexual prime minister, after Iceland (Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir). Elio Di Rupo is the first native French-speaking prime minister since 1979 and the first Walloon prime minister since 1974.

References

External links

  • Tractothèque - Electoral posters and leaflets
  • NSD: European Election Database - Belgium publishes regional level election data; allows for comparisons of election results, 1991–2010
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