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Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference

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Title: Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference  
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Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference

Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference
(MCAC)
Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference logo
Established 1994
Dissolved 2015
Association NAIA
Division Division II
Members 9
Sports fielded 11 (men's: 5; women's: 6)
Region Central United States
Region IV
Commissioner Al Waller (since 1996)
Website .org.mcac-naiawww
Locations
Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference locations

The Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference (MCAC) was an intercollegiate athletic conference that competed in National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Members of the conference were located in the Midwest United States and were located in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa, Arkansas, and Oklahoma.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Commissioners 1.1
    • Conference presidents 1.2
  • Member schools 2
    • Final members 2.1
    • Other members 2.2
  • Conference sports 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

Commissioners

Since 1994 when MCAC was established, to the time it dissolved in 2015, the conference only had two commissioners.[1]

  1. Carl R. Clapp (1994–1995)
  2. Al Waller (1996–2015)

Conference presidents

The conference has board made up of representatives from the member institutions, and one person from a school is selected as the board's president for two years.[1]

  1. Larry Kramer, Avila College (1994–96)
  2. Paul Mills, Wesleyan College (1996–98)
  3. Sr. Tarcisia Roths, Newman University (1998–2000)
  4. Wayne Baker, York College (2000–02)
  5. Aidan Dunleavy, Newman University (2002–04)
  6. Ben Johnson, Peru State College (2004–06)
  7. Wayne Baker, York College (2006–08)
  8. Maryanne Stevens, College of Saint Mary (2008–10)
  9. Steve Eckman, York College (2010–12)
  10. Hal Hoxie Central Christian College (2012–15)

Member schools

Final members

Institution Location Founded Nickname Joined Left Current
Conference
Bellevue University Bellevue, Nebraska 1966 Bruins 1994 2015 North Star
Central Baptist College Conway, Arkansas 1952 Mustangs 2011 2015 American Midwest
Central Christian College of Kansas McPherson, Kansas 1884 Tigers 2002 2015 Independent
Haskell Indian Nations University Lawrence, Kansas 1884 Fighting Indians 2001 2015 Independent
Oklahoma Wesleyan University Bartlesville, Oklahoma 1959 Eagles 1994 2015 Kansas Collegiate
College of the Ozarks Point Lookout, Missouri 1906 Bobcats 1994 2015 Independent
College of Saint Mary Omaha, Nebraska 1923 Flames 1994 2015 Great Plains
Waldorf College Forest City, Iowa 1903 Warriors 2012 2015 North Star
York College York, Nebraska 1890 Panthers 1994 2015 Independent (2015);
Kansas Collegiate (2016–future)

Other members

Institution Location Founded Nickname Joined Left Current
Conference
Avila University Kansas City, Missouri 1916 Eagles 1994 2000 Heart of America
Newman University Wichita, Kansas 1933 Jets 1999 2006 Heartland
(NCAA D-II)
Park University Parkville, Missouri 1875 Pirates 1994 2009 American Midwest
Peru State College Peru, Nebraska 1865 Bobcats 2000 2011 Heart of America
University of Saint Mary Leavenworth, Kansas 1859 Spires 1994 1999 Kansas Collegiate
Southwestern Christian University Bethany, Oklahoma 1946 Eagles 2010 2013 Sooner

Conference sports

The Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference fielded 11 sports (5 men's and 6 women's), which includes:

Conference sports
Sport Men's Women's
Baseball Y
Basketball Y Y
Cross Country Y Y
Golf Y Y
Soccer Y Y
Softball Y
Volleyball Y

References

  1. ^ a b "Midlands Collegiate Athletic Conference Athletics - History". Mcac-naia.org. Retrieved 2015-07-13. 

External links

  • Official website
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