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Zsolnay

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Zsolnay

Eosin glaze of Zsolnay fountain, Pécs

Zsolnay, or formally Zsolnay Porcelánmanufaktúra Zrt (Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacture) is a Hungarian manufacturer of porcelain, tiles, and stoneware. The company introduced the eosin glazing process and pyrogranite ceramics .

History

The Zsolnay factory was established by stock company, and five years later it was bought by a private equity enterprise. In September 2008 a contract was concluded with the Swedish company, IKEA. According to the contract, Zsolnay will deliver 5,000 tonnes of ceramics per year from September 2009. This deal will triple the sales of Ft 1,1 billion (€4,4 million)for Zsolnay.

Beside the factory, there is also the Zsolnay Museum in Pécs.

Eosin

Many Zsolnay ceramics are noted for the use of the eosin process that was introduced in 1893. The process results in a light red iridescence of the first prepared hue, hence the term eosin (Greek eos, flush of dawn). Different eosin colours and processes were developed over time. The eosin-based iridescence became a favourite of art nouveau and Jugendstil artists, among them Sándor Apáti Abt, Lajos Mack, Géza Nikelszky, and József Rippl-Rónai.

The secret eosin glaze renders porcelain to appear iridescent metallic, in different colours that change with the angle of reflection. Typical colours include shades of green, red, blue, and purple.

Pyrogranite

Pyrogranite refers to a type of ornamental ceramics that were developed by Zsolnay and placed in production by 1886. Fired at high temperature, this durable material remains acid and frost-resistant making it suitable for use as roof tiles, indoor and outdoor decorative ceramics, and fireplaces. Architects that used the material in their buildings include Miklós Ybl, Ödön Lechner, Béla Lajta, Samu Pecz, and Imre Steindl. It can be seen in buildings such as Matthias Church, the Hungarian Parliament Building, the Museum of Applied Art, the Geological Institute, the Kőbánya Church, the Gellért Baths (all these buildings are in Budapest), the Town Hall in Kecskemét and many buildings, like the Post Office Palace, in Pécs.

See also

References

  1. ^ Timeline, accessed 1/23/08

External links

  • (Hungarian)Official site
  • Zsolnay art tiles
  • Zsolnay.com
  • Zsolnay Porcelain Factory Architecture
  • Zsolnay Museum
  • Golden Age of Zsolnay
  • Pécs Zsolnay Cultural Complex at funiq.hu
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