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33rd Street (PATH station)

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Title: 33rd Street (PATH station)  
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33rd Street (PATH station)

33rd Street
Station statistics
Address 33rd Street and Sixth Avenue
Manhattan, New York
Coordinates
Line(s) PATH:
  HOB–33
  JSQ–33
Connections New York City Subway:
at 34th Street – Herald Square
Local Transit NYCT Bus: M5, M7, M34 / M34A SBS
Platforms 2 side platforms, 2 island platforms
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened 1910
Rebuilt 1939
Electrified 600V (DC) Third Rail
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Owned by Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Services
Preceding station   PATH   Following station
  Regular service  
toward Hoboken
HOB–33 Terminus
Terminus
Handicapped/disabled access
toward Journal Square
JSQ–33
toward Journal Square
Handicapped/disabled access
  Nights and weekends  
toward Journal Square
JSQ–33 (via HOB) Terminus
toward Journal Square
Handicapped/disabled access

The 33rd Street PATH station, opened on November 10, 1910, is located on Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas), between 32nd and 33rd Streets in Manhattan, under Greeley Square and just south of Herald Square.[1]

The present station is not the original. When the Independent Subway's Sixth Avenue line was being built in 1936 it was necessary to relocate the H & M 33rd Street station. The original station was closed in December 1937. A new terminal station located at 32nd Street was opened September 1939. Although the station is at 32nd Street, the 33rd Street name was retained.

Also, the H & M station at 28th Street, which had opened on November 10, 1910, was closed and demolished. As a partial compensation for the loss of the station, an entrance to the new terminal was opened at 30th Street. A "Gimbels passageway" was formerly used by pedestrians to connect to Penn Station a block to the west under 33rd Street, but was closed in the 1980s for security reasons.

Station layout

G Street Level Exit/Entrance
B1 Mezzanine Fare control, one-way faregates, transfer to New York City Subway  trains at 34th Street – Herald Square
B2
Platform level
Side platform, doors will open on the left
Southbound      HOB–33 toward Hoboken Terminal (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 (via HOB) toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left or right
Southbound      HOB–33 toward Hoboken Terminal (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 (via HOB) toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left or right
Southbound      HOB–33 toward Hoboken Terminal (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
     JSQ–33 (via HOB) toward Journal Square (23rd Street)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
B3 Southbound local do not stop here
Southbound express do not stop here
Northbound express do not stop here →
Northbound local do not stop here →

Nearby attractions

References

  1. ^ "M'Adoo Tubes Now Reach 33rd Street; First Through Train from the Downtown Terminal to New One in the Shopping Belt". The New York Times. November 3, 1910. p. 11. Retrieved 2009-08-16. 

External links

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • PATH - 33rd Street Station
  • 32nd Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 30th Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
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