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ACID Pro

 

ACID Pro

Sony ACID Pro
Developer(s) Sony Creative Software
Stable release 7.0e (Build 713) / June 9, 2010 (2010-06-09)[1]
Operating system Microsoft Windows
Type Digital audio workstation
License Proprietary
Website Sony Creative Software

Sony ACID Pro is a professional digital audio workstation (DAW) software program. It was originally called "ACID pH1" and published by Sonic Foundry, which was later merged into Sony to create Sony Creative Software.

ACID Pro uses Acid Loops (meaning they contain tempo and key information for proper pitch transposition) painted out across the screen to create music tracks. Acidized loop sample CDs are available from Sony, as well as third party companies.

As with most sophisticated software packages, ACID is not a single software product but defines a family of products spanning a significant range of features.[2] In a related-marketing effort, Sony has continued to support ACIDplanet, a content web site originally launched by Sonic Foundry which is aimed at current ACID users, prospective ACID users and the general public. It describes itself as "the Internet's premier site for music, video and unique artists".[3]

Contents

  • ACID Loops 1
  • History 2
  • Other versions 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

ACID Loops

ACID Loops is a technology used with the music making software originally from Sonic Foundry called ACID. Created in 1998, it refers to the repetition, and transposition of sound clips, to form a song. The ACID Pro program is now owned and distributed by Sony, and is on version 7. Sony also now sells a line of Acidized loop sample cds to be used with ACID, as do many third party companies.

Similar technology was added to Cakewalk's Sonar (calling it "Groove Clips") and Cubase (calling it Audio Warp). Although the phrase "acid loops" technically is only associated with Sonic Foundry, some people use the term to refer to the technique even when used with other software packages.

Acidized loops contain tempo and key information, so that ACID can properly time stretch them when pitch shifted.

A website for budding musicians using ACID technology was set up, named ACID Planet.

History

ACID was first launched in 1998 as a loop-based music sequencer, where someone could simply drag-and-drop an Acid loop file (for example a drum or bass loop) onto a track in Acid, and that loop would automatically adjust itself to the tempo and key of the song, with virtually no sonic degradation.

It became very popular with composers, producers, and DJs in the late 1990s and early 2000s, interested in quickly creating beats, music textures, or even complete compositions and orchestrations, that would work with virtually any tempo or key signature, and these loops would adjust automatically. To be able to do this, Sony's Acid Pro uses specially prepared or "Acidized" music sound effect techniques).

Since then, this looping technique has been adopted by the majority of other digital audio workstations on the market, which can also use these acidized loop files. Acid Pro runs on PCs with all versions of Microsoft Windows since Windows 2000. It currently includes over 20 DirectX audio effects, employs the new Media Manager technology, the Beatmapper tool, and the Chopper tool, as well the ability to mix in 5.1 channel surround.

With Acid Pro 6 (released in Q3-2006), Sony introduced a full digital audio workstation which also includes MIDI and multitrack audio recording with full support for ASIO, VST, and VSTI audio, plugins, and music synthesizer standards.

Sonic Foundry sold the Vegas, ACID, Sound Forge, CD Architect, Siren, VideoFactory, ScreenBlast, and Batch Converter product lines to Sony Pictures Digital in July 2003.

Acid Pro 7 now includes a mixing console with vertical faders and more options.

Other versions

  • Sony ACID Xpress is a free version of ACID Pro with a 10 track limit.[4]
  • Sony ACID Music Studio is a simplified, lower-cost version of Sony ACID Pro.

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ comparison chart with link to main homepage
  3. ^ "about" page with link to main homepage
  4. ^ http://www.acidplanet.com/downloads/xpress/

External links

  • Official website
  • Tutorial
  • Comparison of implementations
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