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Age of marriage in the United States

 

Age of marriage in the United States

Age of marriage without parental consent.
  18
  19
  21
Age of marriage with parental consent.
  15
  16
  16 for females
  16 for females; 17 for males
  17
  18 (same as without parental consent)
  other
Some states have exceptions for pregnancy or judicial approval.

The age of marriage in the United States varies by state, but is generally 18. There are, however, two exceptions - Nebraska (19) and Mississippi (21). Most states, however, allow minors below 18 to marry (generally they have to be at least 16 but sometimes lower) with parental and/or judicial consent. Some states allow female minors below 18 to marry without parental or judicial consent, if she is pregnant.

State Minimum age Notes
With parental consent Without parental consent
 Alabama[1] 16 18
 Alaska[2] 16 18
 Arizona[3] 16 18 No minimum age with approval of a superior court judge and parental consent.
 Arkansas[2] 16 for females, 17 for males 18
 California[4] N/A 18 No minimum age with approval of a superior court judge and parental consent.
 Colorado[2][5][6] 16 18 No minimum age with judicial approval and parental consent.
 Connecticut 16 18 Parental and judicial consent required.
 District of Columbia[2] 16 18
 Delaware[2] 16 for females, 17 for males 18
 Florida[2] 16 18
  [2] 15 18 16 without parental consent if pregnant.
 Hawaii[2] 15 18
 Idaho[2] 15 18
 Illinois[2] 16 18
 Indiana[7] 17 18 15 in the case of pregnancy with both parental and judicial consent.
 Iowa[2] 16 18
 Kansas[2] 16 18
 Kentucky[2] 16 18
 Louisiana[2] 16 18
 Maine[2] 16 18
 Massachusetts[2] 12 for females, 14 for males 18 Consent can be either parental or judicial.
 Maryland[2] 16 18
 Michigan 16 18 15 and under with parental consent and probate judge approval.
 Minnesota[2] 16 18
 Mississippi 15 for females, 17 for males (De jure)[8] 21
 Missouri[2] 15 18
 Montana[2] 16 18
 Nebraska[2] 17 19
 Nevada[2] 16 18
 New Hampshire[9] 13 for females, 14 for males 18 In cases of "special cause" with parental consent and court permission.
 New Jersey 16 (see notes) 18 16 with parental consent and in case of pregnancy.
 New Mexico[2] 16 18
 New York[10] 16 18 14 with parental and judicial consent.
 North Carolina 16 18 No minimum in case of pregnancy or birth of child with parental consent.
  North Dakota[2] 16 18
 Ohio[11] 16 for females 18
 Oklahoma[2] 16 18
 Oregon 16 18 Consenting parent or guardian must accompany the applicant when applying for the marriage license.
 Pennsylvania 16 18 14 in case of pregnancy and with the approval of a Judge of the Orphans Court.
 Rhode Island[2] 16 for females 18
 South Carolina[2] 16 18
 South Dakota[2] 16 18
 Tennessee[2] 16 18
 Texas[12] 14 18 Parental or judicial consent required
 Utah[13] 16 18 15 with court approval and parental consent.
 Vermont[2] 16 18
 Virginia[14] 16 18
 Washington[2] 17 18 May be waived by superior court judge.[15]
 West Virginia[2] 16 18 No minimum with both parental and judicial consent
 Wisconsin[2] 16 18
 Wyoming[2] 16 18

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ C.R.S. Colorado Revised Statutes 14-2-106
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^ http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XLIII/457/457-4.htm
  10. ^ Getting Married in New York State Last accessed January 3, 2009
  11. ^ http://www.pibweddings.com/ohiolaw.html
  12. ^ http://www.marriage-laws.info/texas/texas-marriage-laws/
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ Virginia marriage requirements
  15. ^
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