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Andocides

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Andocides

Andocides (;[1] Greek: Ἀνδοκίδης, Andokides; c. 440 – c. 390 BC) was a logographer (speech writer) in Ancient Greece. He was one of the ten Attic orators included in the "Alexandrian Canon" compiled by Aristophanes of Byzantium and Aristarchus of Samothrace in the third century BC.

Life

He was implicated during the Peloponnesian War in the mutilation of the Herms on the eve of the departure of the Athenian expedition against Sicily in 415 BC. Although he saved his life by turning informer, he was condemned to partial loss of civil rights and forced to leave Athens. He engaged in commercial pursuits, and returned to Athens under the general amnesty that followed the restoration of the democracy (403 BC), and filled some important offices. In 391 BC he was one of the ambassadors sent to Sparta to discuss peace terms, but the negotiations failed. Oligarchical in his sympathies, he offended his own party and was distrusted by the democrats.[2]

List of extant speeches

  1. On the Mysteries (Περὶ τῶν μυστηρίων "De Mysteriis"). Andocides' defense against the charge of impiety in attending the Eleusinian Mysteries.
  2. On His Return (Περὶ τῆς ἑαυτοῦ καθόδου "De Reditu"). Andocides' plea for his return and removal of civil disabilities.
  3. On the Peace with Sparta (Περὶ τῆς πρὸς Λακεδαιμονίους εἰρήνης "De Pace"). An argument for peace with Sparta.
  4. Against Alcibiades (Κατὰ Ἀλκιβιάδου "Contra Alcibiadem"). Generally considered spurious.

Notes

  1. ^ "Andocides". The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed., Columbia University Press, 2012.
  2. ^ Chisholm 1911.
Attribution
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain

References

  • Andocides. (Speeches at the Perseus Project.)

External links

  •  Greek Wikisource has original text related to this article: Andocides
  • Andocides Orations
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