World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Aragats

"Aragats" redirects here. For other uses, see Aragats (disambiguation).
Mount Aragats
Mount Aragats
Elevation 4,090 m (13,419 ft)[1][2]
Prominence 2,143 m (7,031 ft)[3]
Listing Country high point
Ultra
Location
Mount Aragats
Location in Armenia
Location Aragatsotn, Armenia
Coordinates

40°32′00″N 44°12′00″E / 40.53333°N 44.20000°E / 40.53333; 44.20000Coordinates: 40°32′00″N 44°12′00″E / 40.53333°N 44.20000°E / 40.53333; 44.20000[2]

Geology
Type Stratovolcano
Age of rock Holocene[2]
Last eruption Unknown [2]

Mount Aragats (Armenian: Արագած, also: Ալագյազ - Alagyaz[4]) is a large andesitic-to-dacitic[5] stratovolcano in northwest Armenia about 40 km northwest of the capital city of Yerevan. It is the highest point in Armenia, located in the province of Aragatsotn, northwest from Yerevan. On its slopes are the Byurakan Observatory and the medieval Amberd Fortress. The observatory is a historically significant facility responsible for a number of important photographic surveys.

The 4,090 m (13,419 ft) high main edifice of Aragats is dissected by glaciers and is of Pliocene-to-Pleistocene age. However, parasitic cones and fissures are on all sides of the volcano and were the source of large lava flows that descended its lower flanks.

Several of these were considered to be of Holocene age, but later Potassium-Argon dating indicated mid- to late-Pleistocene ages. The youngest lower-flank flows have not been precisely dated but are constrained as occurring between the end of the late-Pleistocene and 3000 BC (Kharakanian et al., 2003). A 13-km-long, WSW-ENE-trending line of craters and pyroclastic cones cuts across the northern crater rim and is the source of young lava flows and lahars; the latter were considered to be characteristic of Holocene summit eruptions. The Western and Southern slopes of Mt. Aragats are home to many petroglyphs dating from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age.[6]

Nearby towns

The towns around the mountain include Ashtarak to its southeast, Aparan to its northeast, Artik to its northwest, and Talin to its southwest. On the other sides of the mountains are villages and towns.

Legend of Illuminator's lantern

Legend holds that when Saint Gregory the Illuminator prayed one day on Mount Aragats a miraculous ever-burning lantern hanging from the heavens came down to shed light on him.

Armenians believe that the Illuminator’s lantern is still there, and only those pure in heart and spirit can see the eternal lantern — the symbol of hopes and dreams of the nation.


See also

References

External links

  • Brief description on Cilicia.com
  • Mount Aragats
  • Discover Armenia and Aragats
  • The legend of Illuminator's Lantern
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.