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Baloch nationalism

 

Baloch nationalism

Baloch nationalism is a movement that claims the Baloch people, an ethno-linguistic group mainly found in Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan are a distinct nation. The movement propagates the view that Muslims are not a nation (the opposite of the concept behind the creation of Pakistan) and that ethnic loyalty must surpass religious loyalty.

Baloch ethnicity and nationalism

Languages of Baluchistan

Baloch nationalism stems from lingual roots and is more concentrated in Brohi, Sulemani and Makrani speaking areas of province of Baluchistan. Sindhi (Jadgali Dialect), Saraiki(Khetrani dialect),Rukhshani, Dehvari, Pashto, Hazargi and Mix (Punjabi Settlers) belts population don't support Baloch Nationalism which accounts for more than 60% of population of Balochistan Province.[1]

The Baloch nationalist movement's demands have ranged from greater cultural, economic and political rights, to political autonomy, to outright secession and the creation of an independent state of Balochistan. The movement is secular and heavily influenced by leftist Marxist ideology, like its other counterparts in other parts of Pakistan.

Movement claims to receive considerable support from the Baloch diaspora in Oman, the UAE, Sweden, Norway, and other countries. Pakistan has repeatedly made claims that the Baloch nationalists have received funding from India,[2] although these have been denied by India.[3]

Modern Baloch nationalism

Stalwarts of the Baloch nationalist movement: (l to r) Gul Khan Nasir, Ataullah Mengal, Ghaus Bakhsh Bizenjo

Baloch nationalism in its modern form began in the form of the Anjuman-e-Ittehad-e-Balochan (Organisation for Unity of the Baloch) based in Baloch League.[4]

In February 1937, the Anjuman reorganised and became the Kalat State National Party, carrying on the Anjuman's political agenda of an independent united state of Balochistan.[4] The party was dominated by more secular-minded, anti-imperialist and populist elements, such as Ghaus Bakhsh Bizenjo, Mir Gul Khan Naseer and Abdul Aziz Kurd. When parliamentary elections were held in the State of Kalat, the party was the largest winners with a considerable majority.[4]

The Balochs constitute only 5% of Pakistani population and felt that their issue not addressed by the federal government.

See also

References

  1. ^ Rajshree Jetly "Baluch Ethnicity and Nationalism (1971–81): An Assessment" (National University of Singapore p.13)
  2. ^ "India supporting Baluchistan violence: Pak". Ia.refiff.com. 6 January 2006. Retrieved 14 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "US bails out India from Balochistan wrangle". The Times of India. Retrieved 14 October 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d Baloch Nationalism: Its Origin and Development, Taj Mohammad Breseeg, 2004

Sources

  • In Afghanistan's Shadow: Baluch Nationalism and Soviet Temptations, Selig Harrison, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, New York, 1981
  • Baluch Nationalism and Superpower Rivalry, Selig Harrison, International Security, Vol. 5 No. 3 (Winter 1980-1981) pp 152–163
  • Knights, Not Pawns: Ethno-Nationalism and Regional Dynamics in Post-Colonial Balochistan, Paul Titus and Nina Swidler, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 2000), pp. 47–69

External links

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