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Buddhism in Argentina

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Title: Buddhism in Argentina  
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Buddhism in Argentina

Buddhism in Argentina has been practiced since the early 1980s.

Although Argentina is largely Catholic, Chinese immigrants established the first Chinese temple in 1986, and Korean immigrants founded their own temple. Since then many groups have been giving teachings, some of them rooted in the best known Sōtō tradition from Japan, but also in many Tibetan institutes for the practice of meditation (Mahamudra, Dzog Chen, Lam Rim).

The XIV Dalai Lama visited Buenos Aires twice. The first time was in 1991 or 1992.

Nowadays many branches have flourished and teach.

Many organizations have cooperated to bring the relics of the Buddha to Argentina. This event was supported by the Royal Embassy of Thailand in Buenos Aires.

Among scholars who contributed to the spreading of Buddhism in Argentina are Samuel Wolpin, whose books have opened a door to many students and the general public, and Carmen Dragonetti and Fernando Tola, who have been researching and studying Buddhism for many years, with their books translated to many languages.

Teachers who have visited the country include Pu Hsien, founder of the Tzon Kuan Temple, Mok Sunim, responsible for spreading of Korean Buddhism in the early twentyfirst century, Chogyal Namkhai Norbu, founder of the international Dzog Chen Community who transmitted Dzog Chen teachings here, and Lama Ngawang Sherab Dorje, who visited Argentina many times.

Local teachers include Augusto Alcalde (Diamond Sangha) the first Roshi in this country. Jorge Bustamante, Soto lineage. Alberto Pulisi (Upasaka). Gonzalo Barreiros (Dharma Teacher), and two Argentine lamas, Horacio and Consuelo.

See also

References

  • Buddhist Channel His Holiness Concludes His Argentina Visit
  • Summary of Religious Bodies in Argentina


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