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California's 44th congressional district

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Title: California's 44th congressional district  
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Subject: List of United States Representatives from California, United States congressional delegations from California, Sonny Bono, California's 37th congressional district, United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2010
Collection: Carson, California, Compton, California, Congressional Districts of California, Downey, California, Government in Orange County, California, Government of Los Angeles County, California, Government of Los Angeles, California, Los Angeles Harbor Region, Lynwood, California, Political Districts in Riverside County, California, San Pedro, Los Angeles, South Gate, California, South Los Angeles, Torrance, California, Willowbrook, California, Wilmington, Los Angeles
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California's 44th congressional district

California's 44th congressional district
California's 44th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
California's 44th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Janice Hahn (DLos Angeles)
Area 105.2 mi2 (272.4 km2)
Distribution 100% urban, 0% rural
Population (2010) 702,904
Ethnicity 7.2% White, 16.8% Black, 6.2% Asian, 68.4% Hispanic, 1.5[1]% other
Cook PVI D+32

California's 44th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California. The district is centered in South Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Harbor Region. It is represented by Democrat Janice Hahn.

The 44th District includes the cities and communities of


Former boundaries

Between 2003 and 2013, the 44th district covered an area of Southern California from San Clemente in Orange County on the coast, north-by-northeast inland to Riverside County, including the cities of Corona, Norco, Rubidoux, and Riverside.

Contents

  • Voting 1
  • History 2
  • List of representatives 3
  • Election results 4
    • 1982 4.1
    • 1984 4.2
    • 1986 4.3
    • 1988 4.4
    • 1990 4.5
    • 1992 4.6
    • 1994 4.7
    • 1996 4.8
    • 1998 (Special) 4.9
    • 1998 4.10
    • 2000 4.11
    • 2002 4.12
    • 2004 4.13
    • 2006 4.14
    • 2008 4.15
    • 2010 4.16
    • 2012 4.17
  • Living former Members 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Voting

Year Office Results
1992 U.S. President Clinton 40.6 - 35.7%
U.S. Senator Herschensohn 50.4 - 39.6%
U.S. Senator Feinstein 46.5 - 44.1%
1994 Governor
U.S. Senator
1996 U.S. President[2] Dole 44.6 - 44.1%
1998 Governor
U.S. Senator
2000 U.S. President[3] Bush 49.4 - 46.9%
U.S. Senator[4] Feinstein 51.0 - 42.7%
2002 Governor[5] Simon 55.4 - 37.0%
2003 Recall[6][7] Yes 72.2 - 27.8%
Schwarzenegger 62.6 - 19.3%
2004 U.S. President[8] Bush 59.0 - 39.9%
U.S. Senator[9] Jones 50.5 - 44.9%
2006 Governor[10] Schwarzenegger 66.8 - 28.4%
U.S. Senator[11] Mountjoy 48.3 - 46.4%
2008 U.S. President[12] Obama 49.5 - 48.6%
2010 Governor[13] Whitman 52.9 - 40.8%
U.S. Senator[14] Fiorina 55.4 - 38.6%

History

What was once the 44th Congressional District is now California's 50th Congressional District.

In the 1980s, the 44th District was one of four that divided San Diego. It covered some of the northern and eastern parts of San Diego County. The district had been held for eight years by Democrat Jim Bates and was considered the most Democratic district in the San Diego area. However, Bates was bogged down in a scandal involving charges of sexual harassment. Randy "Duke" Cunningham won the Republican nomination and hammered Bates about the scandal. He won by just a point, meaning that the San Diego area was represented entirely by Republicans for only the second time since the city was split into three districts after the 1960 U.S. Census.

In the 1990 U.S. Census, the district was renumbered the 51st Congressional District, and much of its share of San Diego was moved to the new 50th Congressional District.

List of representatives

Representative Party Dates Notes Counties
District created January 3, 1983
Jim Bates Democratic January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1991 Lost re-election San Diego (San Diego)
Duke Cunningham Republican January 3, 1991 – January 3, 1993 Redistricted to the 51st district
Al McCandless Republican January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995 Redistricted from the 37th district

Retired
Riverside
Sonny Bono Republican January 3, 1995 – January 5, 1998 Died
Vacant January 5, 1998 – April 7, 1998
Mary Bono Republican April 7, 1998 – January 3, 2003 Redistricted to the 45th district
Ken Calvert Republican January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2013 Redistricted from the 43rd district

Redistricted to the 42nd district
Orange (San Clemente), Riverside (Corona, Riverside)
Janice Hahn Democratic January 3, 2013 – present Redistricted from the 36th district South Los Angeles (Carson, Compton, and San Pedro)

Election results

1982 • 1984 • 1986 • 1988 • 1990 • 1992 • 1994 • 1996 • 1998 (Special) • 1998 • 2000 • 2002 • 2004 • 2006 • 2008 • 2010 • 2012

1982

United States House of Representatives elections, 1982[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Bates 78,474 64.9
Republican Shirley M. Gissendanner 38,447 31.8
Libertarian Jim Conole 3,904 3.2
Total votes 120,825 100.0
Voter turnout %
Democratic win (new seat)

1984

United States House of Representatives elections, 1984[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Bates (incumbent) 99,378 69.7
Republican Neill Campbell 39,977 28.0
Libertarian Jim Conole 3,206 2.2
Total votes 142,561 100.0
Voter turnout %
Democratic hold

1986

United States House of Representatives elections, 1986[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Bates (incumbent) 70,557 64.2
Republican Bill Mitchell 36,359 33.1
Peace and Freedom Shirley Rachel Issacson 1,676 1.5
Libertarian Dennis Thompson 1,244 1.1
Total votes 109,836 100.0
Voter turnout %
Democratic hold

1988

United States House of Representatives elections, 1988[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Bates (incumbent) 90,796 59.7
Republican Rob Butterfield 55,511 36.5
Libertarian Dennis Thompson 5,782 3.8
Total votes 152,089 100.0
Voter turnout %
Democratic hold

1990

United States House of Representatives elections, 1990[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Duke Cunningham 50,377 46.3
Democratic Jim Bates (incumbent) 48,712 44.8
Peace and Freedom Donna White 5,237 4.8
Libertarian John Wallner 4,385 4.0
Total votes 108,711 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican gain from Democratic

1992

United States House of Representatives elections, 1992[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Al McCandless (incumbent) 110,333 54.2
Democratic Georgia Smith 81,693 40.1
Libertarian Phil Turner 11,515 5.7
Total votes 203,541 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

1994

United States House of Representatives elections, 1994[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sonny Bono 95,521 55.61
Democratic Steve Clute 65,370 38.06
American Independent Donald Cochran 10,885 6.34
Total votes 171,776 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

1996

United States House of Representatives elections, 1996[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sonny Bono (incumbent) 110,643 57.8
Democratic Anita Rufus 73,844 38.6
American Independent Donald Cochran 3,888 2.0
Natural Law Karen Wilkinson 3,143 1.6
Republican Colleen Cummings (write-in) 110 0.0
Total votes 191,628 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

1998 (Special)

List of special elections to the United States House of Representatives in California[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mary Bono 53,755 63.98
Democratic Ralph Waite 24,228 28.84
Democratic Anna Nevenich 2,415 2.87
Democratic John W. J. Overman 1,435 1.71
Republican Tom Hamey 1,235 1.47
Republican Bud Mathewson 946 1.13
Total votes 84,014 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

1998

United States House of Representatives elections, 1998[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mary Bono (incumbent) 97,013 60.06
Democratic Ralph Waite 57,697 35.72
Natural Law Jim J. Meuer 6,818 4.22
Total votes 161,528 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2000

United States House of Representatives elections, 2000[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mary Bono (incumbent) 123,738 59.2
Democratic Ron Oden 79,302 38.0
Reform Gene Smith 4,135 1.9
Natural Law Jim Meuer 2,012 0.9
Total votes 209,187 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2002

United States House of Representatives elections, 2002[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Calvert (incumbent) 76,686 63.7
Democratic Louis Vandenberg 38,021 31.6
Green Phill Courtney 5,756 4.7
Total votes 120,463 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2004

United States House of Representatives elections, 2004[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Calvert (incumbent) 138,768 61.7
Democratic Louis Vandenberg 78,796 35.0
Peace and Freedom Kevin Akin 7,559 3.3
Total votes 225,123 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2006

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Calvert (incumbent) 89,555 60.0
Democratic Louis Vandenberg 55,275 37.0
Peace and Freedom Kevin Akin 4,486 3.0
Total votes 149,316 100.0
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2008

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008[29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Calvert (incumbent) 129,937 51.19
Democratic Bill Hedrick 123,890 48.81
Total votes 253,827 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2010

United States House of Representatives elections, 2010[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ken Calvert (incumbent) 107,482 55.61
Democratic Bill Hedrick 85,784 44.39
Total votes 193,266 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2012

United States House of Representatives elections, 2012[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Janice Hahn (incumbent) 99,909 60.2
Democratic Laura Richardson (incumbent) 65,989 39.8
Total votes 165,898 100.0
Democratic win (new seat)

Living former Members

As of April 2015, there are five former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's 44th congressional district that are currently living.

Representative Term in office Date of birth (and age)
Jim Bates 1983 - 1991 (1941-07-21) July 21, 1941
Duke Cunningham 1991 - 1993 (1941-12-08) December 8, 1941
Al McCandless 1993 - 1995 (1927-07-23) July 23, 1927
Mary Bono 1998 - 2003 (1961-10-24) October 24, 1961
Ken Calvert 2003 - 2013 (1953-06-08) June 8, 1953

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.latimes.com/la-redistricting-map-july-2011,0,5339409.htmlstory#39.71057374407184,-118.14590136718749,5,usCongress,,,current
  2. ^ (1996 President)
  3. ^ Statement of Vote (2000 President)
  4. ^ Statement of Vote (2000 Senator)
  5. ^ Statement of Vote (2002 Governor)
  6. ^ Statement of Vote (2003 Recall Question)
  7. ^ Statement of Vote (2003 Governor)
  8. ^ Statement of Vote (2004 President)
  9. ^ Statement of Vote (2004 Senator)
  10. ^ Statement of Vote (2006 Governor)
  11. ^ Statement of Vote (2006 Senator)
  12. ^ (2008 President)
  13. ^ Statement of Vote (2010 Governor)
  14. ^ Statement of Vote (2010 Senator)
  15. ^ 1982 election results
  16. ^ 1984 election results
  17. ^ 1986 election results
  18. ^ 1988 election results
  19. ^ 1990 election results
  20. ^ 1992 election results
  21. ^ 1994 election results
  22. ^ 1996 election results
  23. ^ 1998 special election results
  24. ^ 1998 election results
  25. ^ 2000 election results
  26. ^ 2002 general election results
  27. ^ 2004 general election results
  28. ^ 2006 general election results
  29. ^ 2008 general election results
  30. ^ 2010 general election results
  31. ^ 2012 general election results

External links

  • GovTrack.us: California's 44th congressional district
  • RAND California Election Returns: District Definitions
  • California Voter Foundation map - CD44

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