Chilaca

Pasilla
Two pasilla chiles
Heat Scoville scale 1,000–3,999


Pasilla (pronounced pah-SEE-yah; literally "little raisin") refers to more than one variety of chili pepper in the species Capsicum annuum.[1] A true pasilla is the dried form of the long and narrow chilaca pepper.[2] However, in the United States producers and grocers often incorrectly use pasilla to describe the poblano, a different, wider variety of pepper whose dried form is called an ancho.[3][4]

Pasillas are used especially in sauces. They are sold whole or powdered in Mexico, the United States, and the United Kingdom.[5]

Chile negro or chilaca

The pasilla chile or chile negro is the dried form of a variety of Capsicum annuum named for its dark, wrinkled skin. In its fresh form, it is called the chilaca. It is a mild to medium-hot, rich-flavored chile. It is generally 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) long and 1 to 1.5 inches (2.5 to 4 cm) in diameter. The fresh narrow chilaca can measure up to 9 inches (22 cm) long and often has a twisted shape, which is seldom apparent after drying. It turns from dark green to dark brown when fully mature.[6]

Pasilla de Oaxaca is a variety of smoked pasilla chile from Oaxaca used in mole negro.[7]

Pasilla peppers are often combined with fruits and are excellent served with duck, seafood, lamb, mushrooms, garlic, fennel, honey, or oregano.[8]

See also

References

Further reading

  • Kennedy, Diana. The Cuisines of Mexico (revised edition) New York: Harper & Row, 1986.
  • Kennedy, Diana. From My Mexican Kitchen: Techniques and Ingredients. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2003.
  • McMahan, Jacqueline Higuera. Red & Green Chile Cookbook. Lake Hughes, CA: The Olive Press, 1992.

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