World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Conservation of fungi

Article Id: WHEBN0032365597
Reproduction Date:

Title: Conservation of fungi  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Assisted natural regeneration, Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust, Center for Plant Conservation, Roadside conservation, Conservation agriculture
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Conservation of fungi

Fungi are considered to be in urgent need of conservation by the British Mycological Society on the grounds that it is a traditionally neglected taxon which has legal protection in few countries.[1] Current threats to fungi include destruction of forests worldwide, fragmentation of habitat, changes in land use, pollution, anthropogenic climate change and over-exploitation of commercially attractive species.[1]

The Species Survival Commission of the IUCN has five specialist groups dealing with the conservation of fungi:[2]

  • Chytrid, Zygomycete, Downy Mildew and Slime Mould Specialist Group
  • Cup-fungus, Truffle and Ally Specialist Group
  • Lichen Specialist Group
  • Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball Specialist Group
  • Rust and Smut Specialist Group

Lack of knowledge is considered a major concern with a general paucity of comprehensive checklists, even for developed nations. In addition, the criteria for "red-listing" is not specifically designed for fungi and the kinds of data required, viz. population size, lifespan, spatial distribution and population dynamics are poorly known for most fungi. As a result in practice, indicator species are identified as target foci for the conservation of threatened fungi.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b Régis (2 July 2001). "Current trends and perspectives for the global conservation of fungi". In Moore, David. ( British Mycological Society. Symposium). Fungal conservation: issues and solutions : a special volume of the British Mycological Society. Cambridge University Press. pp. 8–9.  
  2. ^ Unattributed (September 17, 2010). "IUCN - Fungi". Species Survival Commission. Retrieved 10 July 2011. 
  3. ^ Jacob; Jan (2008). "Conservation:selection criteria and approaches". In Boddy, Lynne; Frankland, Juliet C. & West, Pieter. Ecology of saprotrophic basidiomycetes. British Mycological Society & Academic Press. pp. 325–347.  


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.