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Daniel Imperato

Florida gubernatorial election, 2010
Florida
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2006 ←
November 2, 2010
→ 2014
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Nominee Rick Scott Alex Sink
Party Republican Democratic
Running mate Jennifer Carroll Rod Smith
Popular vote 2,619,335 2,557,785
Percentage 48.87 47.72
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width="Template:Str number/trim" colspan=4 style="text-align: center" | Election results by county
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Governor before election

Charlie Crist[1]
Independent

Elected Governor

Rick Scott
Republican

The 2010 Florida gubernatorial election took place on November 2, 2010. Republican-turned-independent incumbent Governor Charlie Crist chose not to run for a second term and instead ran for the Senate seat vacated by Mel Martinez.[2] This resulted in an open race for Governor of Florida. Republican Rick Scott narrowly defeated Democrat Alex Sink in the general election.

Candidates

Republican

Democratic

Independence Party of Florida

  • Peter L. Allen, electrical inspector

No party affiliation

  • Michael E. Arth, policy analyst and urban designer who entered the race as a Democrat in June 2009 and later switched to no party affiliation in June 2010
  • Farid Khavari, economist, author, and small business owner
  • Daniel Imperato[3]
  • Calvin Clarence "C.C." Reed

Primary results

Democratic

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Democratic Alex Sink 663,802 76.9%
Democratic Brian Moore 199,896 23.1%
Totals 863,698 100%

Republican

Republican primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Rick Scott 595,474 46.4%
Republican Bill McCollum 557,427 43.4%
Republican Mike McCalister 130,056 10.1%
Totals 1,282,957 100%

Campaign

The race was dominated by the two major party candidates and spending on their behalf. By the October 25, 2010 Tampa debate between Scott and Sink, Scott had spent $60 million of his own money on the campaign compared to Sink's $28 million.[5] Total campaign expenditure for the race exceeded $100 million, far exceeding any previous spending for a governor's race in Florida.[6]

Polling

Democratic primary

Republican primary

General election

Poll source Dates administered Bud Chiles (I) Rick Scott (R) Alex Sink (D)
Mason-Dixon May 3–5, 2010 36% 38%
Rasmussen Reports May 16, 2010 41% 40%
Rasmussen Reports June 7, 2010 45% 40%
Quinnipiac June 7, 2010 13% 35% 26%
Florida Chamber of Commerce June 9–13, 2010 15% 31% 26%
Ipsos/Reuters July 9–11, 2010 12% 34% 31%
Public Policy Polling July 16–18, 2010 13% 30% 36%
Quinnipiac July 22–27, 2010 14% 29% 27%
The Florida Poll July 24–28, 2010 11% 30% 28%
Rasmussen Reports August 2, 2010 16% 35% 31%
Ipsos/Florida Newspapers August 6–10, 2010 14% 30% 29%
Mason-Dixon August 9–11, 2010 17% 24% 40%
Quinnipiac August 11–16, 2010 12% 29% 33%
Public Policy Polling August 21–22, 2010 8% 34% 41%
Rasmussen Reports August 25, 2010 4% 45% 42%
Rasmussen Reports September 1, 2010 45% 44%
Sunshine State News September 1–7, 2010 42% 44%
CNN September 2–7, 2010 42% 49%
FOX News September 11, 2010 41% 49%
Reuters/Ipsos September 12, 2010 45% 47%
Mason-Dixon September 20–22, 2010 40% 47%
Rasmussen Reports September 22, 2010 50% 44%
Quinnipiac September 23–28, 2010 49% 43%
CNN September 24–28, 2010 47% 45%
Sunshine State News September 26 – October 3, 2010 44% 42%
TCPalm.com / Zogby September 27–29, 2010 39% 41%
Florida Chamber of Commerce September 27–30, 2010 46% 42%
Rasmussen Reports September 30, 2010 46% 41%
Mason-Dixon October 4–6, 2010 40% 44%
Miami-Dade College October 5, 2010 52% 46%
Quinnipiac October 6–8, 2010 45% 44%
Rasmussen Reports October 7, 2010 50% 47%
PPP October 9–10, 2010 41% 46%
Susquehanna October 12–13, 2010 45% 48%
Suffolk October 14–17, 2010 38% 45%
CNN Opinion Research October 15–19, 2010 49% 46%
Ipsos/ St. Pete Times October 15–19, 2010 44% 41%
Rasmussen Reports October 18, 2010 50% 44%
Naples Daily News / Zogby October 18–21, 2010 39% 43%
Quinnipiac October 18–24, 2010 41% 45%
Susquehanna October 20, 2010 45% 45%
Susquehanna/ Sunshine State News October 24–25, 2010 47% 45%
Univ. of South Fla. Polytechnic October 23–27, 2010 44% 39%
Quinnipiac October 25–31, 2010 43% 44%
Mason-Dixon October 26–27, 2010 43% 46%
Rasmussen Reports October 27, 2010 48% 45%
Susquehanna/ Sunshine State October 29–31, 2010 46% 49%
Public Policy Polling October 30–31, 2010 47% 48%

Hypothetical Polls

Election results

Florida gubernatorial election, 2010[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rick Scott 2,619,335 48.87% -3.31%
Democratic Alex Sink 2,557,785 47.72% +2.62%
Independence Party Peter Allen 123,831 2.31%
Independent C. C. Reed 18,842 0.35%
Independent Michael E. Arth 18,644 0.35%
Independent Daniel Imperato 13,690 0.26%
Independent Farid Khavari 7,487 0.14%
Write-ins 121 0.00%
Majority 61,550 1.15% -5.92%
Turnout 5,359,735

See also

References

External links

  • Florida Division of Elections
  • Project Vote Smart
  • Campaign contributions for 2010 Florida Governor from Follow the Money
  • Florida Governor 2010 from OurCampaigns.com
  • 2010 Florida Gubernatorial General Election: All Head-to-Head Matchups graph of multiple polls from Pollster.com
  • Rasmussen Reports
  • Real Clear Politics
  • CQ Politics
  • The New York Times
Official campaign websites
  • Peter Allen for Governor
  • Michael E. Arth for Governor
  • Farid Khavari for Governor
  • Rick Scott for Governor
  • Alex Sink for Governor
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