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David Cobb (Massachusetts)

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Title: David Cobb (Massachusetts)  
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Subject: United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 1790, United States House of Representatives elections, 1794, Theophilus Bradbury, Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat, Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
Collection: 1748 Births, 1830 Deaths, 18Th-Century American Physicians, American Militia Generals, Continental Army Officers from Massachusetts, Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University Alumni, Massachusetts Federalists, Massachusetts State Senators, Members of the American Antiquarian Society, Members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, Members of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts, People from Taunton, Massachusetts, People of Colonial Massachusetts, Presidents of the Massachusetts Senate, Speakers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
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David Cobb (Massachusetts)

David Cobb
8th Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
In office
1809–1810
Governor Christopher Gore
Preceded by Levi Lincoln, Sr.
Succeeded by William Gray
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat
In office
March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
Preceded by Seat created
Succeeded by Seat eliminated
President of the Massachusetts Senate
In office
1801–1805
Preceded by Samuel Phillips, Jr.
Succeeded by Harrison Gray Otis
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
In office
May 1789[1] – January 1793[1]
Preceded by Theodore Sedgwick
Succeeded by Edward Robbins
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
In office
May 1789[1] – January 1793[1]
Personal details
Born September 14, 1748
Attleboro, Massachusetts
Died April 17, 1830(1830-04-17) (aged 81)
Taunton, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Eleanor Bradish[2]
Relations Robert Treat Paine, brother in law.[3]
Children Eleanor Bradish Cobb, b. March 23, 1767; d. October 30, 1842.
Betsy Cobb, b. June 5, 1768.
Thomas Cobb, b. June 29, 1772; d. October 27, 1849.
William Gray Cobb, b. February 10, 1773; d. November 4, 1791.
Eunice Cobb, b. November 17, 1774; d. June 6, 1826.
Mary Cobb, b. July 26, 1776; d. October 17, 1851.
David Cobb, b. April 3, 1778.
Sally Cobb, b. January 15, 1780; d. age 17.
Ebenezer Bradish Cobb, b. October 30, 1781; d. 1840.
Henry Jackson Cobb, b. December 18, 1784; d. July 1848.
David George Washington Cobb, January 14, 1790; February 27, 1832.[4]
Profession Physician
Signature
Military service
Allegiance  United States Continental Congress
Service/branch Continental Army, Massachusetts Militia
Years of service 1776-1781, 1786
Rank lieutenant colonel, major general
Unit George Washington
Commands Fifth Division of the Massachusetts Militia[1]
Battles/wars American Revolutionary War, New York and New Jersey campaign, Battle of Springfield, Battle of Monmouth. Quaker Hill, R.I.,[3] Shays' Rebellion

David Cobb (September 14, 1748 – April 17, 1830) was a Massachusetts physician, military officer, jurist, and politician who served as a U.S. Congressman for Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Massachusetts Government 2
  • Congress 3
  • Maine 4
  • Legacy 5
  • Notes 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Biography

Born in major general of militia in 1786 and rendered conspicuous service during Shays' Rebellion. He was a charter member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1780.[5]

Massachusetts Government

Judge of the Bristol County Court of Common Pleas 1784-1796; member of the State house of representatives 1789-1793, and the Massachusetts Senate and served as Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and President of the Massachusetts Senate.

Congress

Elected to the Third United States Congress (March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795).

Maine

Cobb moved to Gouldsboro in the district of Maine in 1796 and engaged in agricultural pursuits; elected to the Massachusetts Senate from the eastern district of Maine in 1802 and served as president; elected to the Massachusetts Governor's Council in 1808; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts in 1809; member of the board of military defense in 1812; chief justice of the Hancock County (Maine) court of common pleas; returned in 1817 to Taunton, where he died on April 17, 1830. His remains were interred in Plain Cemetery.

Cobb was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society in 1814.[6]

Legacy

In 1976, David Cobb was honored by being on a postage stamp for the United States Postal Service.

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July–August 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, Maine, p. 2 
  2. ^ Porter, p. 6
  3. ^ a b The Daughters of Liberty (1904), Historical researches of Gouldsboro, Maine, Gouldsboro, Maine: The Daughters of Liberty, p. 22 
  4. ^ Porter, p. 6-7
  5. ^ "Charter of Incorporation of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved July 28, 2014. 
  6. ^ American Antiquarian Society Members Directory

References

  • Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, MassPorter, Joseph Whitcomb: (1888).

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
May 1789 – January 1793
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Theodore Sedgwick
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
May 1789 – January 1793
Succeeded by
Edward Robbins
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Seat created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat

March 4, 1793 – March 4, 1795
Succeeded by
Seat eliminated
Political offices
Preceded by
Member of the Massachusetts State Senate
1801 – 1805
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Samuel Phillips, Jr.
President of the Massachusetts State Senate
1801 – 1805
Succeeded by
Harrison Gray Otis
Preceded by
Levi Lincoln, Sr.
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1809 – 1810
Succeeded by
William Gray
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