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Geosteering

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Title: Geosteering  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Logging while drilling, Drilling engineering, Shale gas, Deviation survey, Telemetry
Collection: Boreholes, Drilling Technology, Petroleum Production
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Geosteering

In the process of drilling a borehole, geosteering is the act of adjusting the borehole position (inclination and azimuth angles) on the fly to reach one or more geological targets. These changes are based on geological information gathered while drilling.

Description

From 2D and 3D models of underground substructures, deviated wells (2D and 3D) are planned in advance to achieve specific goals: exploration, fluids production, fluids injection or technical.

A well plan is a continuous succession of straight and curved lines representing the geometrical figure of the expected well path. A well plan is always projected on vertical and horizontal maps.

While the borehole is being drilled according to the well plan, new geological information is gathered from mud logging, measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD). These usually show some differences from what is expected from the model. As the model is continuously updated with the new geological information (formation evaluation) and the borehole position (well deviation survey), changes start to appear in the geological substructures and can lead to the well plan being updated to reach the corrected geological targets.[1]

The following data can be used for the geosteering: MWD, LWD, Image logs, 2D and 3D seismic data, geological models.[2]

See also

References

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  2. ^


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