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Grafton County, New Hampshire

Grafton County, New Hampshire
Grafton County Courthouse in Haverhill
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Grafton County
Location in the state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire
New Hampshire's location in the U.S.
Founded 1769
Named for Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton
Seat Haverhill
Largest city Lebanon
Area
 • Total 1,750 sq mi (4,532 km2)
 • Land 1,709 sq mi (4,426 km2)
 • Water 41 sq mi (106 km2), 2.3%
Population
 • (2010) 89,118
 • Density 52/sq mi (20/km²)
Congressional districts 1st, 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website .us.nh.grafton.cowww

Grafton County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 89,118.[1] Its county seat is North Haverhill,[2] which is a village within the town of Haverhill. Until 1972, the county courthouse and other offices were located in downtown Woodsville, a larger village within the town of Haverhill.

Grafton County is part of the Claremont-Lebanon, NH–VT Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The county is the home of Dartmouth College and Plymouth State University. Progressive Farmer rated Grafton County fourth in its list of the "Best Places to Live in Rural America" in 2006, citing low unemployment (despite slow economic growth), a favorable cost of living, and the presence of White Mountain National Forest, the state's only national forest.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Adjacent counties 2.1
    • National protected area 2.2
  • Demographics 3
  • Politics and government 4
    • County Commission 4.1
    • Legislative branch 4.2
      • Members 4.2.1
  • Media 5
  • Communities 6
    • City 6.1
    • Towns 6.2
    • Township 6.3
    • Census-designated places 6.4
    • Villages 6.5
  • See also 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

Grafton was one of the five counties originally identified for New Hampshire in 1769. It was named for Woodsville in 1771, and originally included the entire northern frontier of New Hampshire, including a number of towns that are now in Vermont. In 1803, the northern area was removed for the formation of Coos County. The three counties to the south were Strafford, Hillsborough and Cheshire, and the eastern edge bordered the "District of Maine". In 1797, the county contained 50 townships and 17 locations, and had a population of 23,093.[4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,750 square miles (4,500 km2), of which 1,709 square miles (4,430 km2) is land and 41 square miles (110 km2) (2.3%) is water.[5] It is the second-largest county in New Hampshire by area.

Grafton County is heavily rural. About half of its total area is in the White Mountain National Forest. Squam Lake, featured in the film On Golden Pond, and the Old Man of the Mountain landmark are located here, as are Dartmouth College and the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. Many of the 4,000-foot mountains of New Hampshire are within the county. The Appalachian Trail passes through parts of at least ten towns in the county.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 81,743 people, 31,598 households, and 20,254 families residing in the county. The population density was 48 people per square mile (18/km²). There were 43,729 housing units at an average density of 26 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.76% White, 1.73% Asian, 0.53% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. 1.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.0% were of English, 12.9% Irish, 11.1% French, 7.8% American, 7.5% German, 6.8% French Canadian and 5.5% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.1% spoke English, 1.5% French and 1.3% Spanish as their first language.

There were 31,598 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.90% were non-families. 27.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the county the population was spread out with 21.90% under the age of 18, 13.50% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 13.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,962, and the median income for a family was $50,424. Males had a median income of $31,874 versus $25,286 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,227. About 5.10% of families and 8.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.60% of those under age 18 and 7.50% of those age 65 or over.

Politics and government

Presidential election results[12]
Year Democratic Republican
2012 60.9% 29,826 37.2% 18,208
2008 63.0% 31,446 35.5% 17,687
2004 55.7% 26,180 43.2% 20,277
2000 47.3% 18,326 46.7% 18,092

In the 2008, Barack Obama carried Grafton by a landslide, receiving 63.03% of the vote to John McCain's 35.45%. It was Obama's highest percentage by county in New Hampshire.[13]

County Commission

The executive power of Grafton County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county.

District Name Hometown Party
District 1 Michael J. Cryans Hanover, NH Democratic
District 2 Linda Lauer Bath, NH Democratic
District 3 Martha B. Richards Holderness, NH Democratic

In addition to the County Commission, there are also five directly-elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer.

Office Name
County Attorney Lara Saffo (D)[14]
Register of Deeds Kelley Monahan (D)
County Sheriff Doug Dutile (R)
Register of Probate Michael Wopinski (I) [15]
County Treasurer Bonnie Parker (D)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Grafton County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of December 2012 there are 27 members from 17 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
  Democratic Party 21 77.8%
  Republican Party 6 22.2%
Total 27 100%

Members

Media

(Compiled from Radiostationworld.com)

Communities

City

Towns

Township

Census-designated places

Villages

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 140. 
  4. ^ Morse, Jedidiah: "The American Gazetteer", Thomas & Andrews, 1810
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved December 27, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  12. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2011-06-11. 
  13. ^ U.S. Election Atlas
  14. ^ Also nominated by the Democratic Party in the most recent election.
  15. ^ http://sos.nh.gov/Elections/Election_Information/2014_Elections/General_Election/County_Offices_-_2014_General_Election.aspx?id=8589941849

External links

  • Grafton County official website
  • Grafton County profile, from University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension website
  • Grafton County Economic Development Council
  • National Register of Historic places of Grafton County

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