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Harry Shearer

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Subject: List of recurring The Simpsons characters, List of one-time The Simpsons characters, The Simpsons, Christopher Guest, Waylon Smithers
Collection: 1943 Births, American Comedians, American Comedy Musicians, American Documentary Filmmakers, American Impressionists (Entertainers), American Male Child Actors, American Male Film Actors, American Male Radio Actors, American Male Television Actors, American Male Voice Actors, American People of Austrian-Jewish Descent, American People of Polish-Jewish Descent, American Radio Personalities, American Satirists, American Sketch Comedians, American Television Writers, Harvard University Alumni, Jewish American Male Actors, Jewish Comedians, Kcrw, Living People, Male Actors from Los Angeles, California, Male Television Writers, Musicians from Los Angeles, California, Primetime Emmy Award Winners, The Huffington Post Writers and Columnists, University of California, Los Angeles Alumni
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Harry Shearer

Contents

  • Taxonavigation 1
  • Name 2
    • Synonyms 2.1
  • References 3
  • Early life 4
  • Early life 5
  • Career 6
    • Saturday Night Live 6.1
  • Early life 7

Taxonavigation

Species: Noctua noacki

Name

Noctua noacki (Boursin, 1957)

Type locality: Teneriffa, Arafo, 400 m.

Holotype: Coll. Noack. male ♂. 8.VII.1953.

Synonyms

  • Triphaena noacki Boursin, 1957
  • Noctua noacki distincta Pinker, 1969 (preoccupied by Noctua distincta Lempke, 1939)

References

  • Boursin, C., 1957: Vorläufige Diagnosen einiger neuer Phalaenidae von den Kanaren nebst Beschreibung eines neuen Subgenus. (Beiträge zur Kenntnis der "Agrotidae-Trifinae", XCVII/97). Zeitschrift der Wiener Entomologischen Gesellschaft 42: 140-143. Full article: [1].
  • Pinker, R., 1969: Dipsosphecia vulcanica n. sp. – In: Interessante und neue Funde und Erkenntnisse für die Lepidopterenfauna der Kanaren. IV. Zeitschrift der Wiener Entomologischen Gesellschaft 53 (7-12) (1968): 65-93. (75-78). Full article: [2].
Harry Shearer
Shearer giving a speech in August 2009
Born Harry Julius Shearer
(1943-12-23) December 23, 1943
Los Angeles
Occupation Actor, comedian, screenwriter, voice artist, musician, author, radio host, director
Years active 1953–present
Spouse(s) Penny Nichols (1974–1977)
Judith Owen (1993–present)
Website
.com.harryshearerwww

Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American actor, comedian, writer, voice artist, musician, author, radio host and director. Hecomedy]], is carried on many public radio stations throughout the United States.

In 1989, Shearer became a part of the cast of The Simpsons. He was initially reluctant because he thought the recording sessions would be too much trouble. He felt voice acting was "not a lot of fun" because traditionally, voice actors record their parts separately. He provides voices for numerous characters, including Mr. Burns, Waylon Smithers, Ned Flanders, Reverend Lovejoy, Kent Brockman, Dr. Hibbert, Lenny Leonard, Principal Skinner, Otto Mann and Rainier Wolfcastle. Shearer has been vocal about what he perceives as the show's declining quality. In 2004, he said "I rate the last three seasons as among the worst."[1]

Shearer directed the 2002 film Teddy Bears' Picnic and appeared in several films, including A Mighty Wind, For Your Consideration, The Simpsons Movie, The Truman Show, and Godzilla among many others. Shearer has written three books: Man Bites Town; It's the Stupidity, Stupid; and Not Enough Indians. He has been married to singer-songwriter Judith Owen since 1993. On August 16, 2014, Shearer earned his first Primetime Emmy Award for his voice-over work on The Simpsons. He has also received several other Primetime Emmy Award and Grammy Award nominations. In 2008, it was announced that Shearer would receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the radio category.

He is currently a professor at Loyola University New Orleans.

Early life

Mel Blanc took Shearer "under his wing" during his early days in show-business.

Shearer was born December 23, 1943 in Los Angeles, the son of Dora Warren (née Kohn), a book-keeper, and Mack Shearer.[2] His parents were Jewish immigrants from Austria and Poland.[3][4] Starting when Shearer was four years old, he had a piano teacher whose daughter worked as a child actress. The piano teacher later decided to make a career change and become a children's agent, as she knew people in the business through her daughter's work. The teacher asked Shearer's parents for permission to take him to an audition. Several months later, she called Shearer's parents and told them that she had gotten Shearer an audition for the radio show The Jack Benny Program. Shearer received the role when he was seven years old.[6][7] Starting when Shearer was four years old, he had a piano teacher whose daughter worked as a child actress. The piano teacher later decided to make a career change and become a children's agent, as she knew people in the business through her daughter's work. The teacher asked Shearer's parents for permission to take him to an audition. Several months later, she called Shearer's parents and told them that she had gotten Shearer an audition for the radio show The Jack Benny Program. Shearer received the role when he was seven years old.[6] He described Jack Benny as "very warm and approachable [...] He was a guy who dug the idea of other people on the show getting laughs, which sort of spoiled me for other people in comedy."[8] Shearer said in an interview that one person who "took him under his wing" and was one of his best friends during his early days in show business was voice actor Mel Blanc, who voiced many animated characters, including Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Barney Rubble.[9] Shearer made his film debut in the 1953 film Abbott and Costello Go to Mars, in which he only had a small part. Later that year, he made his first big film performance in The Robe.[8] Throughout his childhood and teenage years he worked in television, film, and radio.[8] In 1957, Shearer played the precursor to the Eddie Haskell character in the pilot episode of the television series Leave It to Beaver. After the filming, Shearer's parents said they did not want him to be a regular in a series. Instead they wanted him to just do occasional work so that he could have a normal childhood. Shearer and his parents made the decision not to accept the role in the series if it was picked up by a television network.[8]

Shearer attended UCLA as a political science major in the early 1960s and decided to quit show business to become a "serious person".[6] However, he says this lasted approximately a month, and he joined the staff of the Daily Bruin, UCLA's school newspaper, during his first year.[6] He also worked as a newscaster at KRLA, a top 40 radio station in Pasadena, during this period. According to Shearer, after graduating, he had "a very serious agenda going on, and it was 'Stay Out of the Draft'."[6] He attended graduate school at Harvard University for one year and worked at the state legislature in Sacramento. In 1967 and 1968 he was a high school teacher, teaching English and social studies. He left teaching following "disagreements with the administration."[6]

From 1969 to 1976, Shearer was a member of The Credibility Gap, a radio comedy group that included David Lander, Richard Beebe and Michael McKean.[10] The group consisted of "a bunch of newsmen" at KRLA 1110, "the number two station" in Los Angeles.[8] They wanted to do more than just straight news, so they hired comedians who were talented vocalists. Shearer heard about it from a friend so he brought over a tape to the station and nervously gave it to the receptionist. By the time he got home, there was a message on his answering machine asking, "Can you come to work tomorrow?"[8] The group's radio show was canceled in 1970 by KRLA and in 1971 by KPPC-FM, so they started performing in various clubs and concert venues.[6] While at KRLA, Shearer also interviewed Creedence Clearwater Revival for the Pop Chronicles music documentary.[11] In 1973, Shearer appeared as Jim Houseafire on How Time Flys, an album by The Firesign Theatre's David Ossman. The Credibility Gap broke up 1976 when Lander and McKean left to perform in the sitcom Laverne & Shirley.[6] Shearer started working with Albert Brooks, producing one of Brooks' albums and co-writing the film Real Life. Shearer also started writing for Martin Mull's television series Fernwood 2 Night.[6] In the mid-1970s, he started working with Rob Reiner on a pilot for ABC. The show, which starred Christopher Guest, Tom Leopold and McKean, was not picked up.[6]

Career

Saturday Night Live

In August 1979, Shearer was hired as a writer and cast member on Saturday Night Live, one of the first additions to the cast,[8] and an unofficial replacement for John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd, who were both leaving the show.[12] Al Franken recommended Shearer to Saturday Night Live creator Lorne Michaels.[13] Shearer describes his experience on the show as a "living hell" and "not a real pleasant place to work."[12] He did not get along well with the other writers and cast members and states that he was not included with the cast in the opening montage (although he was added to the montage for latter episodes of the 1979-80 season) and that Lorne Michaels had told the rest of the cast that he was just a writer.[14] Michaels left Saturday Night Live at the end of the fifth season, taking the entire cast with him.[15] Shearer told new executive producer Jean Doumanian that he was "not a fan of Lorne's" and offered to stay with the show if he was given the chance to overhaul the program and bring in experienced comedians, like Christopher Guest. However, Doumanian turned him down, so he decided to leave with the rest of the cast.[16]

When I left, Dick [Ebersol] issued a press release, saying "creative differences." And the first person who called me for a comment on it read me that and I blurted out, "Yeah, I was creative and they were different."

—Harry Shearer[17]
In 1984, while promoting the film This Is Spinal Tap, Shearer, Christopher Guest and Michael McKean had a performance on Saturday Night Live. All three members were offered the chance to join to the show in the 1984–1985 season. Shearer accepted because he was treated well by the producers and he thought the backstage environment had improved[12] but later stated that he "didn't realiz
Harry Shearer
Shearer giving a speech in August 2009
Born Harry Julius Shearer
(1943-12-23) December 23, 1943
Los Angeles
Occupation Actor, comedian, screenwriter, voice artist, musician, author, radio host, director
Years active 1953–present
Spouse(s) Penny Nichols (1974–1977)
Judith Owen (1993–present)
Website
.com.harryshearerwww

Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American actor, comedian, writer, voice artist, musician, author, radio host and director. He is known for his long-running roles on The Simpsons, his work on Saturday Night Live, the comedy band Spinal Tap and his radio program Le Show. Born in Los Angeles, California, Shearer began his career as a child actor, appearing in The Jack Benny Program, as well as the 1953 films Abbott and Costello Go to Mars and The Robe. In 1957, Shearer played the precursor to the Eddie Haskell character in the pilot episode for the television series Leave It to Beaver, but his parents decided not to let him continue in the role so that he could have a normal childhood.

From 1969 to 1976, Shearer was a member of The Credibility Gap, a radio comedy group. Following the breakup of the group, Shearer co-wrote the film Real Life with Albert Brooks and started writing for Martin Mull's television series Fernwood 2 Night. In August 1979, Shearer was hired as a writer and cast member on Saturday Night Live. Shearer describes his experience on the show as a "living hell" and he did not get along well with the other writers and cast members. He left the show in 1980. Shearer co-created, co-wrote and co-starred in the 1984 film This Is Spinal Tap, a satirical rockumentary about a band called Spinal Tap. Shearer portrayed Derek Smalls, the bassist, and Michael McKean and Christopher Guest played the other two members. The film became a cult hit and the band has since released several albums and played several concerts. While promoting the film, Shearer was offered the chance to return to Saturday Night Live. He accepted, but left the show for good in January 1985, just three months into the season. Since 1983, Shearer has been the host of the public radio comedy/music program Le Show on Santa Monica's NPR-affiliated radio station, KCRW. The program, a hodgepodge of satirical news commentary, music, and sketch comedy, is carried on many public radio stations throughout the United States.

In 1989, Shearer became a part of the cast of The Simpsons. He was initially reluctant because he thought the recording sessions would be too much trouble. He felt voice acting was "not a lot of fun" because traditionally, voice actors record their parts separately. He provides voices for numerous characters, including Mr. Burns, Waylon Smithers, Ned Flanders, Reverend Lovejoy, Kent Brockman, Dr. Hibbert, Lenny Leonard, Principal Skinner, Otto Mann and Rainier Wolfcastle. Shearer has been vocal about what he perceives as the show's declining quality. In 2004, he said "I rate the last three seasons as among the worst."[1]

Shearer directed the 2002 film Teddy Bears' Picnic and appeared in several films, including A Mighty Wind, For Your Consideration, The Simpsons Movie, The Truman Show, and Godzilla among many others. Shearer has written three books: Man Bites Town; It's the Stupidity, Stupid; and Not Enough Indians. He has been married to singer-songwriter Judith Owen since 1993. On August 16, 2014, Shearer earned his first Primetime Emmy Award for his voice-over work on The Simpsons. He has also received several other Primetime Emmy Award and Grammy Award nominations. In 2008, it was announced that Shearer would receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the radio category.

He is currently a professor at Loyola University New Orleans.

Early life

Mel Blanc took Shearer "under his wing" during his early days in show-business.

Shearer was born December 23, 1943 in Los Angeles, the son of Dora Warren (née Kohn), a book-keeper, and Mack Shearer.[2] His parents were Jewish immigrants from Austria and Poland.[18][19] Starting when Shearer was four years old, he had a piano teacher whose daughter worked as a child actress. The piano teacher later decided to make a career change and become a children's agent, as she knew people in the business through her daughter's work. The teacher asked Shearer's parents for permission to take him to an audition. Several months later, she called Shearer's parents and told them that she had gotten Shearer an audition for the radio show The Jack Benny Program. Shearer received the role when he was seven years old.[6]

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