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IHF World Women's Handball Championship

IHF World Women's Handball Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event 2015 World Women's Handball Championship
Sport Handball
Founded 1949
No. of teams 24
Continent International (IHF)
Most recent champion(s)  Brazil

The IHF World Women's Handball Championship has been organized by the International Handball Federation since 1949.

Contents

  • Championships 1
    • Indoor, 7 players a team 1.1
  • Medal count 2
  • Participation history 3
  • Largest winning margin 4
  • References 5
  • See also 6
  • External links 7

Championships

Only 4 teams participated in the first championship, this number grew to the present 24 which was introduced in 1997. In 1977 a B tournament was introduced and later in 1986 a C-tournament which served as qualification for the real championship or A-tournament. The B and C tournament qualifications were replaced by the present qualification system in 1993.[1] From 1993 it has been held every other year, between 1978 and 1990 it was held every fourth alternating with the Olympic tournament (introduced for women handball in 1976), and before that it was held more irregularly. The first five tournaments were held in the summer or early fall whereas the rest has been held in November or December.[1]

Indoor, 7 players a team

Year Host country Gold medal game Bronze medal game
Gold Score Silver Bronze Score Fourth place
1957
Yugoslavia

Czechoslovakia
7 – 1
Hungary

Yugoslavia
9 – 6
West Germany
1962
Romania

Romania
8 – 5
Denmark

Czechoslovakia
6 – 5
Yugoslavia
1965
West Germany

Hungary
5 – 3
Yugoslavia

West Germany
11 – 10
Czechoslovakia
1971
Netherlands

East Germany
11 – 8
Yugoslavia

Hungary
12 – 11
Romania
1973
Yugoslavia

Yugoslavia
16 – 11
Romania

Soviet Union
20 – 12
Hungary
1975
Soviet Union

East Germany
no final
Soviet Union

Hungary
no 3rd place playoff
Romania
1978
Czechoslovakia

East Germany
no final
Soviet Union

Hungary
no 3rd place playoff
Czechoslovakia
1982
Hungary

Soviet Union
no final
Hungary

Yugoslavia
no 3rd place playoff
East Germany
1986
Netherlands

Soviet Union
30 – 22
Czechoslovakia

Norway
23 – 19
East Germany
1990
South Korea

Soviet Union
24 – 22
Yugoslavia

East Germany
25 – 19
West Germany
1993
Norway

Germany
22 – 21
OT

Denmark

Norway
20 – 19
Romania
1995
Austria / Hungary

South Korea
25 – 20
Hungary

Denmark
25 – 24
Norway
1997
Germany

Denmark
33 – 20
Norway

Germany
27 – 25
Russia
1999
Denmark / Norway

Norway
25 – 24
2OT

France

Austria
31 – 28
OT

Romania
2001
Italy

Russia
30 – 25
Norway

Yugoslavia
42 – 40
Denmark
2003
Croatia

France
32 – 29
OT

Hungary

South Korea
31 – 29
Ukraine
2005
Russia

Russia
28 – 23
Romania

Hungary
27 – 24
Denmark
2007
France

Russia
29 – 24
Norway

Germany
36 – 35
OT

Romania
2009
China

Russia
25 – 22
France

Norway
31 – 26
Spain
2011
Brazil

Norway
32 – 24
France

Spain
24 – 18
Denmark
2013
Serbia

Brazil
22 – 20
Serbia

Denmark
30 – 26
Poland
2015
Denmark
2017
Germany
2019
Japan

Medal count

IHF only includes medals won at the indoor championships.[2]
 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Russia 4 0 0 4
2  Soviet Union 3 2 1 6
3  East Germany 3 0 1 4
4  Norway 2 3 3 8
5  Hungary 1 4 4 9
6  Yugoslavia 1 3 3 7
7  France 1 3 0 4
8  Denmark 1 2 2 5
9  Romania 1 2 0 3
10  Czechoslovakia 1 1 1 3
11  Germany 1 0 3 4
12  South Korea 1 0 1 2
13  Brazil 1 0 0 1
14  Serbia 0 1 0 1
15  Austria 0 0 1 1
 Spain 0 0 1 1
Total 21 21 21 63

Participation history

Best result of participants
Source: IHF official site.[2]
Team 1957 1962 1965 1971 1973 1975 1978 1982 1986 1990 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
 Algeria 10–12 19 22
 Angola 16 16 13–16 15 15 13 17 16 7 11 8 16 Q
 Argentina 24 22 20 20 19 23 19 Q
 Australia 23 23 24 24 24 24 24
 Austria 6 12 5 8 8 11 3 7 11 13 16 10
 Belarus 16 14
 Bulgaria 10 12
 Brazil 17–20 23 16 12 20 7 14 15 5 1 Q
 Cameroon 22
 Canada 10–12 15 17–20 20
 Chile 23
 China 9 8 14 13–16 22 18 11 19 17 21 12 21 18 Q
 Congo 12 22 22 17 20
 Ivory Coast 17–20 14 20 21 21 18 16
 Croatia 10 6 14 11 9 7
 Cuba 21 22 Q
 Czech Republic 13–16 13 19 15 15
 DR Congo 20 Q
 Denmark 5 2 5 6 7 9 10 2 3 1 6 4 13 4 5 4 3 Q
 Dominican Republic 22 23
 France 15 14 10 2 5 1 12 5 2 2 6 Q
 Germany 1 5 3 7 12 6 3 7 17 7 Q
 Greenland 24
 Hungary 2 5 1 3 4 3 3 2 8 7 2 9 5 6 2 3 8 9 8 Q
 Iceland 12
 Italy 16
 Japan 9 7 9 10 10 14 13–16 17 17 20 16 18 19 16 14 14 Q
Team 1957 1962 1965 1971 1973 1975 1978 1982 1986 1990 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015
 Kazakhstan 18 22 19 Q
 Lithuania 13
 Macedonia 7 8 21 15 12
 Montenegro 10 11 Q
 Netherlands 8 12 9 10 10 14 5 15 13 Q
 Norway 7 8 8 7 3 6 3 4 2 1 2 6 9 2 3 1 5 Q
 Paraguay 23 21
 Poland 7 7 8 5 7 6 13 9 10 8 11 19 11 4 Q
 Puerto Rico Q
 Romania 9 1 6 4 2 4 7 8 5 7 4 7 12 4 17 10 2 4 8 13 10 Q
 Russia 5 6 4 12 1 7 1 1 1 6 Q
 Serbia 3 9 2 Q
 Slovakia 12
 Slovenia 18 9 8 14
 South Korea 10–12 6 11 11 11 1 5 9 15 3 8 6 6 11 12 Q
 Spain 15 10 5 10 4 3 9 Q
 Sweden 8 13 6 11 8 13 9 Q
 Thailand 21
 Tunisia 12 19 18 15 14 18 17 Q
 Ukraine 9 13 18 4 10 13 17
 United States 11 11 16 12 17–20
 Uruguay 24 23 24 23 20
 Uzbekistan 21
Discontinued teams
 Czechoslovakia 1 3 4 6 6 4 5 2 9
 East Germany 1 9 1 1 4 4 3
 Soviet Union 6 3 2 2 1 1 1
 West Germany 4 8 3 5 11 8 9 7 4
 Yugoslavia 3 4 2 2 1 5 5 3 6 2
Best result for discontinued states

Largest winning margin

Margin Winning team Score Opponent WC
48 Hungary  57–9  Australia 2005
45 Sweden  66–21  Australia 2009
41 Austria  52–11  Thailand 2009
40 Russia  48–8  Australia 2009
39 Angola  47–8  Australia 2005
38 Netherlands  53–15  Australia 2011
38 South Korea  50–12  Paraguay 2007
38 Yugoslavia  41–3  Tunisia 1975
37 Norway  48–11  Uruguay 2001
37 Norway  47–10  Australia 2005
37 Russia  45–8  Australia 2011
37 Russia  45–8  Thailand 2009
37 Denmark  42–5  Argentina 1999
35 Austria  45–10  Australia 2009
35 Croatia  44–9  Uruguay 2005
34 Romania  51–17  Chile 2009
34 Hungary  48–14  Chile 2009
34 South Korea  45–11  Australia 2011
34 China  45–11  Australia 2011
34 Poland  40–6  Paraguay 2013

Source: TV2Sporten.no

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ a b IHF official site (ihf.info): Page 51: MEDALS TABLE

See also

External links

  • Women's WC at IHF
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