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Indians in the New York City metropolitan region

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Indians in the New York City metropolitan region

Indians in the New York City metropolitan region
India Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA, known as Little Bombay[1] and home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere,[2] is one of at least 24 Indian American enclaves characterized as a Little India which have emerged within the New York City Metropolitan Area, with the largest metropolitan Indian population outside Asia, as large-scale immigration from India continues into New York.[3][4][5][6]
Hindi name
Hindi न्यूयॉर्क शहर महानगरीय क्षेत्र में भारतीय
N'yūyŏrk śhahar mahānagarīya kṣētra mēṁ bhāratīya (Indians living in the NY Metro Area)

Indians in the New York City metropolitan region constitute one of the largest and fastest growing ethnicities in the New York City metropolitan area of the United States. The New York City region is home to the largest Indian American population among metropolitan areas by a significant margin, enumerating 679,173 individuals by 2014 U.S. Census estimates.[7] The Asian Indian population also represents the second largest Asian American community in the New York City metropolitan area, following the also rapidly growing population of Chinese Americans in the New York City metropolitan area.[8]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Demographics 2
    • New York City boroughs 2.1
    • Medium and small-sized cities, as of 2012 American Community Survey 2.2
    • List of Little Indias 2.3
      • In New Jersey 2.3.1
        • India Square, Jersey City 2.3.1.1
      • In New York 2.3.2
  • Culture 3
    • Indian Independence Day Parade 3.1
    • Arts, entertainment, and media 3.2
      • News publications in English 3.2.1
    • Food and culinary 3.3
    • Diwali, Eid/Ramadan as school holidays 3.4
  • Economic clout 4
  • Notable NYC-area Indians 5
    • Business 5.1
    • Education 5.2
    • Health 5.3
    • Law, politics, and diplomacy 5.4
    • Media 5.5
    • Theater and arts 5.6
  • See also 6
  • References 7

History

New India House, the home of the Indian Consulate-General in New York, on East 64th Street, in the Upper East Side Historic District of Manhattan

It was after the Luce–Celler Act of 1946 that Indian Americans were restored naturalization rights in the United States.[9] A number of Indian Americans came to the U.S. via Indian communities in other countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa, Mauritius, Malaysia, Singapore, Suriname, Guyana, Fiji, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Trinidad & Tobago, and Jamaica. The quota on Indian immigration was removed in the 1960s, leading to exponential growth in the number of Indian immigrants to the United States.[10] While Indians prior to this time were primarily involved in agricultural endeavors or constructing railroads in the western United States,[10] the largest number hereafter came to New York City and its suburban environs, consisting largely of professionals, including physicians, engineers, financiers, scientists, entrepreneurs, and lawyers, as well as businesspeople.[10]

Demographics

All except the pink/lavender-illustrated counties compose the New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island NY–NJ–PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, the most populous in the US:
     New York–Jersey City–White Plains, NY–NJ Metropolitan Division
     Dutchess County–Putnam County, NY Metropolitan Division
     Nassau County–Suffolk County, NY Metropolitan Division
     Newark, NJ–PA Metropolitan Division
     Remainder of the New York-Newark, NY–NJ–CT–PA Combined Statistical Area

The New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area, consisting of New York City, Long Island, and adjacent areas within New York State, as well as nearby areas within the states of New Jersey (extending to Trenton), Connecticut (extending to Bridgeport), and including Pike County, Pennsylvania, was home to an estimated 659,784 Indian Americans as of the 2013 American Community Survey by the U.S. Census Bureau,[7] comprising by far the largest Indian American population of any metropolitan area in the United States;[11] New York City itself also contains by far the highest Indian American population of any individual city in North America, at approximately 207,000.[12] As of December 2014, Indian airline carriers Air India and Jet Airways as well as United States airline carrier United Airlines were all offering direct flights from the New York City Metropolitan Area to and from India. At least twenty four Indian American enclaves characterized as a Little India have emerged in the New York City metropolitan area.

The Indian American population in the New York City metropolitan region was second in its population as an Asian ethnicity only to the approximately 779,269 Chinese Americans in the New York City area as of 2013.[7] However, while the presence and growth of the Chinese population is focused on New York City and Long Island in New York State, the gravitas of the Indian population is roughly evenly split between New Jersey and New York State.[13][14] Smaller populations of Asian Indians reside in the Connecticut and Pennsylvania portions of the New York City metropolitan region. Jersey City in New Jersey has the highest proportion of Asian Indians of any major U.S. city, comprising 10.9% of the overall population of Jersey City in 2010,[15] increasing to 11.4% by 2013.[16] Bergen County, New Jersey and Rockland County, New York are home to the highest concentrations of Malayalis outside of India.[17]

In 2013, 10,818 Indians legally immigrated to the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA core based statistical area;[18] in 2012, this number was 10,550;[19] 11,256 in 2011;[20] and 11,388 in 2010.[21] These numbers do not include the remainder of the New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area. A study by the Pew Research Center found that in 2013, New Jersey held the distinction of being the only U.S. state in which immigrants born in India composed the largest foreign-born nationality, representing roughly 10% of all foreign-born residents in the state.[22]

New York City boroughs

As the city proper with the nation's largest Asian Indian population by a wide margin, with an estimated 207,196 individuals as of the 2012 American Community Survey,[23] and as the primary destination for new Indian immigrants,[24] New York City is subdivided into official municipal boroughs, which themselves are home to significant Asian Indian and other South Asian populations. Note that this list includes neither the large Desi populations of Pakistani Americans, Bangladeshi Americans, and Sri Lankan Americans, nor Indo-Caribbean Americans, Afghan Americans, and others of South Asian origin who make their home in New York City.

Rank Borough City Indian Americans Density of Indian Americans per square mile Percentage of Indian Americans in municipality's population
1 Queens New York City 134,173 1,228.3 5.9
2 Brooklyn New York City 25,270 357.9 1.0
3 Manhattan New York City 24,359 1,060.9 1.5
4 The Bronx New York City 16,748 398.6 1.2
5 Staten Island New York City 6,646 113.6 1.4
Total New York City 207,196 684.7 2.5

Medium and small-sized cities, as of 2012 American Community Survey[25]

New Jersey - (New Jersey, and Middlesex County in Central New Jersey, are home to by far the highest per capita Indian American populations of any U.S. state and U.S. county, respectively, at 3.9%[13] and 14.1%,[26] by 2013 U.S. Census estimates.

---

New York

List of Little Indias

In New Jersey

India Square, Jersey City

India Square, also known as Little India or Little Bombay,[1] home to the highest concentration of Asian Indians in the Western Hemisphere,[2] is a rapidly growing Indian American ethnic enclave in Jersey City. The neighborhood is centered on Newark Avenue, between Tonnelle Avenue and JFK Boulevard, and is considered to be part of the larger Journal Square District. This area has been home to the largest outdoor Navratri festivities in New Jersey as well as several Hindu temples.[29] This portion of Newark Avenue is lined with groceries,[30] electronics vendors, video stores, clothing stores, and restaurants, and is one of the busier pedestrian areas of this part of the city, often stopping traffic for hours. According to the 2000 census, there were nearly 13,000 Indians living in this two-block stretch of Jersey City, up from 3,000 in 1980, increasing commensurately between 2000 and 2010.[31] An annual spring Holi festival has taken place in Jersey City since 1992, centered upon India Square and attracting significant participation and international media attention.[32]

Indian restaurant on 74th Street in Jackson Heights, Queens

In New York

Culture

New York City's annual India Day Parade, the world's largest Indian Independence Day parade outside India,[41] marches down Madison Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. The parade addresses controversial themes, including racism, sexism, corruption, and Bollywood.
The Hindu Temple Society of North America, representing Sri Maha Vallabha Ganapati Devasthanam (Sanskrit: श्री महावल्लभ गणपति देवस्थानम्, Tamil: ஸ்ரீ மகா வல்லப கணபதி தேவஸ்தானம்), the oldest Hindu temple in the United States, in Flushing, Queens.

Indian Independence Day Parade

The annual New York City India Day Parade, held on or approximately every August 15th since 1981, is the world's largest dance schools participate in program on 23rd Street and Madison Avenue until 6PM."[42]

Arts, entertainment, and media

In September 2014, approximately 19,000 Indian Americans attended a live appearance and speech by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at Madison Square Garden in Midtown Manhattan;[43][44] this appearance was televised worldwide and was estimated to have been watched by a billion-strong global audience of Indians in India and overseas.

News publications in English

Food and culinary

The growth in the New York City metropolitan region's Asian Indian populace has been accompanied by growth in the number of Indian restaurants, located both within and outside of traditional Indian enclaves, such that within New York City proper alone, there are hundreds of Indian restaurants.[45] According to David Shaftel of The New York Times in December 2014, the food at New York City's many chain restaurants is worthy of their flagships in India; the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood south of Murray Hill, namely Rose Hill, has been nicknamed Curry Hill, and provides an abundance of multinational India-based chains specializing in South Indian cuisine.[45]

In 1968, a family of Bengali brothers inaugurated the restaurant Shah Bag at 320 East 6th Street in the East Village of Lower Manhattan, followed by others, with the intention of "making an Indian street".[38] In time, this stretch of East 6th Street between First and Second Avenues evolved the nickname Curry Row, with a dense collection of North Indian restaurants.

Diwali, Eid/Ramadan as school holidays

Momentum has been growing to recognize the Hindu holy day Diwali/Deepavali as a holiday on school district calendars in the New York City metropolitan region.[46][47] Passaic, New Jersey established Diwali as a school holiday in 2005.[46][47] South Brunswick, New Jersey in 2010 became the first of the many school districts with large Indian student populations in Middlesex County to add Diwali to the school calendar.[47] Glen Rock, New Jersey in February 2015 became the first municipality in Bergen County, with its own burgeoning Indian population post-2010,[27][48] to recognize Diwali as an annual school holiday.[49][50]

Efforts have been undertaken in Millburn,[46] Monroe Township (Middlesex County), West Windsor-Plainsboro, Bernards Township, and North Brunswick, New Jersey,[47] Long Island, as well as in New York City,[51][52] among other school districts in the metropolitan region, to make Diwali a holiday on the school calendar. According to the Star-Ledger, Edison, New Jersey councilman Sudhanshu Prasad has noted parents' engagement in making Deepavali a holiday there; while in Jersey City, the four schools with major Asian Indian populations mark the holiday by inviting parents to the school buildings for festivities.[47]

In March 2015, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio officially declared the Muslim holy days Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha holidays on the school calendar.[51] School districts in Paterson and South Brunswick, New Jersey observe Ramadan.[47]

Economic clout

Indian pharmaceutical companies are coming to New Jersey to gain a foothold in the United States.[53] Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, based in Hyderabad, set up its U.S. headquarters in Princeton, New Jersey.[54] Kitex Garments, based in Kerala and India's largest children's clothing manufacturer, opened its first U.S. office in Montvale, New Jersey in October 2015.[55]

Notable NYC-area Indians

Indians in the New York City metropolitan region

Business

Education

Health

Law, politics, and diplomacy

Media

Theater and arts

See also

References

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