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Jacob Read

Jacob Read
8th President pro tempore of the United States Senate
In office
November 22, 1797 – December 12, 1797
Preceded by William Bradford
Succeeded by Theodore Sedgwick
United States Senator
from South Carolina
In office
March 4, 1795 – March 4, 1801
Preceded by Ralph Izard
Succeeded by John E. Colhoun
6th Speaker of the South Carolina House of Representatives
In office
January 5, 1789 - December 17, 1794
Preceded by John J. Pringle
Succeeded by Robert Barnwell
Personal details
Born 1752
near Charleston, South Carolina
Died July 17, 1816 (aged 63–64)
near Charleston, South Carolina
Resting place I'on Cemetery (Historic Hobcaw Cemetery), Bond/Read Family Cemetery
Political party Federalist
Occupation Planter, Politician
Profession Lawyer

Jacob Read (1752 - July 17, 1816) was an American lawyer and politician from Charleston, South Carolina. He represented South Carolina in both the Continental Congress (1783–1785) and the United States Senate (1795–1801).

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Career 2
  • Death 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Biography

Read was born at “Hobcaw” plantation in Christ Church Parish, near Charleston, South Carolina, in 1752. After he completed preparatory studies, he studied law and was admitted to the bar. He also studied in England from 1773 to 1776. He joined other Americans in London in 1774 in a petition against the Boston port bill.

Career

When Read returned to the United States, he served South Carolina in various military and civil capacities during the Revolutionary War. He was sent with other Americans as a prisoner of the British to St. Augustine from 1780 to 1781. He was a member of the State assembly in 1782, and of the privy council in 1783. He served as a Member of the Continental Congress from 1783 to 1785, and was a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from St. Philip's and St. Michael's Parish. His service in the state lower house lasted from January 8, 1782 to December 17, 1794, and served as Speaker for the last five years in that house.[1]

Elected as a Federalist to the United States Senate, Read served a single term from March 4, 1795, to March 3, 1801.[2] He served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Fifth Congress for about a month, but was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection. He was succeeded by Democratic-Republican John E. Colhoun.

Death

Read died in Charleston, South Carolina, on July 17, 1816 (age about 64 years). He is interred in the Bond/Read family cemetery at “Hobcaw,” in Christ Church Parish, near Charleston.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Jacob Read". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 1 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Jacob Read". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 1 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Jacob Read". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 1 July 2013. 

External links


United States Senate
Preceded by
Ralph Izard
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from South Carolina
1795–1801
Served alongside: Pierce Butler, John Hunter, Charles Pinckney
Succeeded by
John Ewing Colhoun
Political offices
Preceded by
William Bradford
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
November 22, 1797 – December 12, 1797
Succeeded by
Theodore Sedgwick
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