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Josiah Quincy III

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Subject: William Eustis, John Thornton Kirkland, Cornelius Conway Felton, Josiah Quincy (1859–1919), History of Harvard University
Collection: 1772 Births, 1864 Deaths, Burials at Mount Auburn Cemetery, Burials in Massachusetts, Federalist Party Members of the United States House of Representatives, Harvard University Alumni, Massachusetts Federalists, Massachusetts State Senators, Mayors of Boston, Massachusetts, Members of the American Antiquarian Society, Members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, Members of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts, People from Quincy, Massachusetts, Phillips Academy Alumni, Presidents of Harvard University, Quincy Family, Speakers of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
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Josiah Quincy III

Josiah Quincy III
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 1st district
In office
March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1813
Preceded by William Eustis
Succeeded by Artemas Ward, Jr.
2nd Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts
In office
May 1, 1823[1] – January 5, 1829[2]
Preceded by John Phillips
Succeeded by Harrison Gray Otis
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
In office
January 10, 1821[3] – 1822
Preceded by Elijah H. Mills
Succeeded by Luther Lawrence
16th President of Harvard University
In office
1829–1845
Preceded by John Thornton Kirkland
Succeeded by Edward Everett
Personal details
Born (1772-02-04)February 4, 1772
Boston, Massachusetts
Died July 1, 1864(1864-07-01) (aged 92)
Quincy, Massachusetts
Resting place Mount Auburn Cemetery[4]
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Eliza Susan Morton[5]
Children Eliza Susan Quincy, Josiah Quincy, Jr., Abigail Phillips Quincy, Maria Sophia Quincy, Margaret Morton Quincy, Edmund Quincy, Anna Cabot Lowell Quincy
Alma mater Harvard
Profession Politician, university president
Religion Unitarian

Josiah Quincy III (; February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1805–1813), Mayor of Boston (1823–1828), and President of Harvard University (1829–1845). The historic Quincy Market in downtown Boston is named in his honor.

Contents

  • Life and politics 1
    • Early life and education 1.1
    • Career 1.2
  • Works 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes and references 4
  • External links 5

Life and politics

Five Harvard University Presidents sitting in order of when they served. L-R: Josiah Quincy III, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, James Walker and Cornelius Conway Felton.

Early life and education

Quincy, the son of Josiah Quincy II and Abigail Phillips,[5] was born in Boston, on that part of Washington Street that was then known as Marlborough Street.[6] His father had traveled to England in 1774, partly for his health but mainly as an agent of the patriot cause to with the friends of the colonists in London. Josiah Quincy II died off the coast of Gloucester on April 26, 1776. His son, young Josiah, was not yet three years old.[7]

He entered Phillips Academy, Andover, when it opened in 1778, and graduated from Harvard in 1790. After his graduation from Harvard he studied law for three years under the tutorship of William Tudor.[8] Quincy was admitted to the bar in 1793, but was never a prominent advocate.

In 1797 Quincy married Eliza Susan Morton of New York, younger sister of Jacob Morton.[5][9] They had seven children: Eliza Susan Quincy, Josiah Quincy, Jr., Abigail Phillips Quincy, Maria Sophia Quincy, Margaret Morton Quincy, Edmund Quincy, and Anna Cabot Lowell Quincy.

Career

In 1798 Quincy was appointed Boston Town Orator by the Board of Selectmen, and in 1800 he was elected to the School Committee.[10] Quincy became a leader of the Federalist party in Massachusetts, was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States House of Representatives in 1800, and served in the Massachusetts Senate in 1804–5.[11]

From 1805 to 1813, he was a member of the United States House of Representatives where he was one of the small Federalist minority. He attempted to secure the exemption of fishing vessels from the Embargo Act, urged the strengthening of the United States Navy, and vigorously opposed the admittance of Louisiana as a state in 1811. In this last matter he stated as his "deliberate opinion, that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States that compose it are free from their moral obligations; and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation, amicably if they can, violently if they must."[12] This was probably the first assertion of the right of secession on the floor of Congress. Quincy left Congress because he saw that the Federalist opposition was useless.[11]

In 1812, Quincy was a founding member of the American Antiquarian Society.[13]

Josiah Quincy, oil on canvas, Gilbert Stuart, 1824–1825. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

After leaving Congress, Quincy was a member of the Massachusetts Senate until 1820. In 1821–22 he was a member and speaker of the

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
William Eustis
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 1st congressional district

March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1813
Succeeded by
Artemas Ward, Jr.
Political offices
Preceded by
Elijah H. Mills
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
1821–1822
Succeeded by
Luther Lawrence
Preceded by
John Phillips
2nd Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts
May 1, 1823 – January 5, 1829
Succeeded by
Harrison Gray Otis
Preceded by
John Thornton Kirkland
16th President of Harvard University
1829–1846
Succeeded by
Edward Everett

External links

 

Attribution
  1. ^ City Council of Boston (1909), A Catalogue of the City Councils of Boston, 1822–1908, Roxbury, 1846–1867, Charlestown 1847–1873 and of The Selectmen of Boston, 1634–1822 also of Various Other Town and Municipal officers, Boston, MA: City of Boston Printing Department, p. 213 
  2. ^ City Council of Boston (1909), A Catalogue of the City Councils of Boston, 1822–1908, Roxbury, 1846–1867, Charlestown 1847–1873 and of The Selectmen of Boston, 1634–1822 also of Various Other Town and Municipal officers, Boston, MA: City of Boston Printing Department, p. 219 
  3. ^ Crocker, Matthew H. (1999), Matthew H. Crocker. The Magic of the Many: Josiah Quincy and the Rise of Mass Politics in Boston 1800–1830., Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, p. 42. 
  4. ^ Quincy, Edmund (1868), Life of Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts, Cambridge, MA: University Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., p. 545. 
  5. ^ a b c Allibone, S. Austin (1870), A critical dictionary of English literature, and British and American Authors vol. II, Philadelphia, PA: J.B. Lippincott & Co., p. 1718. 
  6. ^ Quincy, Edmund (1868), Life of Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts, Cambridge, MA: University Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., p. 18. 
  7. ^ Quincy, Edmund (1868), Life of Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts, Cambridge, MA: University Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., p. 12. 
  8. ^ Quincy, Edmund (1868), Life of Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts, Cambridge, MA: University Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., pp. 34–35. 
  9. ^  
  10. ^ McCaughey, Robert A. (1974), Josiah Quincy, 1772–1864: the last Federalist. No. 90 in the Harvard Historical Studies series., Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, p. 19. 
  11. ^ a b c d Chisholm 1911.
  12. ^ Speech on January 14, 1811. In Gales, Joseph (1853). The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States: With an Appendix, Containing Important State Papers and Public Documents, and All the Laws of a Public Nature; with a Copious Index. Eleventh Congress, Session 3. Washington: Gales and Seaton, 526. Retrieved on 2008-11-15.
  13. ^ American Antiquarian Society Members Directory
  14. ^ a b Quincy, Josiah (1852), A municipal history of the town and city of Boston during two centuries, Boston, MA: Charles Little and James Brown, p. 41. 
  15. ^ Quincy, Josiah (1852), A municipal history of the town and city of Boston during two centuries, Boston, MA: Charles Little and James Brown, pp. 435–440. 
  16. ^ The History of Quincy House at Harvard College, harvard.edu website [2] 
  17. ^ "Death of Hon. Josiah Quincy.", New York Times (New York , NY), July 4, 1864: 1 
  18. ^ Quincy, Edmund (1868), Life of Josiah Quincy of Massachusetts, Cambridge, MA: University Press: Welch, Bigelow, & Co., p. 544. 

Notes and references

See also

  • A Municipal History of the Town and City of Boston During Two Centuries from September 17, 1630 to September 17, 1830, Boston : Charles C. Little & James Brown, 1852.
  • History of Harvard University. Cambridge, MA., 1840.
  • The History of the Boston Athenæum, with Biographical Notices of its Deceased Founders. Cambridge, MA., Metcalf and Company, 1851.
  • Essay on the Soiling of Cattle". 1852.

Works

His last years were spent principally on his farm in Quincy, Massachusetts, where he died on July 1, 1864.[17][18]

From 1829 to 1845, he was President of [11] Quincy House, one of the university's twelve upperclass residential houses, is named for him.[16]

[11]

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