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List of U.S. chemical weapons topics

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Title: List of U.S. chemical weapons topics  
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List of U.S. chemical weapons topics

The United States chemical weapons program began in 1917 during World War I with the creation of the U.S. Army's Gas Service Section and ended 73 years later in 1990 with the country's practical adoption of the Chemical Weapons Convention (signed 1993; entered into force, 1997). Destruction of stockpiled chemical weapons began in 1985 and is still ongoing. The U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, continues to operate for purely defensive research and education purposes.

Agencies and organizations

Army agencies and schools

The U.S. chemical weapons programs have generally been run by the U.S. Army:

The regimental insignia of the U.S. Army Chemical Corps

Units

Modern chemical depots

Active bases

Closed bases

Older chemical weapons program locations

Treaties, laws and policy

The U.S. is party to several treaties which limit chemical weapons:

Weapons

M134 cluster bomblets in an Honest John warhead

Canceled weapon projects

While these weapon systems were developed, they were not produced or stored in the US chemical weapons stockpile.

Vehicles

Declared stockpile and other weapons

An M55 rocket being destroyed in 1990

Stockpiled chemical agents

Ball-and-stick model of the (S) enantiomer of VX

Agents stockpiled at the time of Chemical Weapons Convention:

Older chemical agents

Other equipment

Exercises, incidents, and accidents

Operations and exercises

Accidents

Chemical testing

Chemical defense program

See also

References

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