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MLX (gene)

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MLX (gene)

MLX, MAX dimerization protein
Identifiers
Symbols  ; MAD7; MXD7; TCFL4; bHLHd13
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Max-like protein X is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MLX gene.[1][2] The product of this gene belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors. These factors form heterodimers with Mad proteins and play a role in proliferation, determination and differentiation. This gene product may act to diversify Mad family function by its restricted association with a subset of the Mad family of transcriptional repressors, namely Mad1 and Mad4. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been identified for this gene.[2]

Interactions

MLX (gene) has been shown to interact with MNT,[3][4] MXD1[3][4] and MLXIPL.[3]

References

  1. ^ Bjerknes M, Cheng H (January 1997). "TCFL4: a gene at 17q21.1 encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper transcription factor". Gene 181 (1–2): 7–11.  
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: MLX MAX-like protein X". 
  3. ^ a b c Cairo, S; Merla G; Urbinati F; Ballabio A; Reymond A (March 2001). "WBSCR14, a gene mapping to the Williams--Beuren syndrome deleted region, is a new member of the Mlx transcription factor network". Hum. Mol. Genet. (England) 10 (6): 617–27.  
  4. ^ a b Meroni, G; Cairo S; Merla G; Messali S; Brent R; Ballabio A; Reymond A (July 2000). "Mlx, a new Max-like bHLHZip family member: the center stage of a novel transcription factors regulatory pathway?". Oncogene (ENGLAND) 19 (29): 3266–77.  

Further reading

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.


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