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Massachusetts's 5th congressional district

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Massachusetts's 5th congressional district

Massachusetts' 5th congressional district is a congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. The district is represented by Katherine Clark. Massachusetts congressional redistricting after the 2010 census has changed the borders of the district starting with the elections of 2012, with the new 3rd district largely taking the place of the old 5th.[1] The 5th district had covered many of the communities represented in the old 7th district. As of 2010, the population of the 5th congressional district was 727,515. On July 15, 2013, Ed Markey resigned from the seat to become the junior Senator from Massachusetts. On December 10, 2013, Democrat Katherine Clark won a special election to fill the seat for the remainder of the 113th Congress.[2] She was sworn in to office on December 12, 2013.

Demographics

The district has been in Democratic hands without interruption since 1975. Before Paul Tsongas' victory that year, it had only elected three Democrats in its entire existence and had been in Republican hands since 1895.

It was one of the more moderate districts in heavily Democratic Massachusetts before redistricting in 2013. In state races, it supported Republican candidates for Governor William Weld, Paul Celluci, and Mitt Romney. In the 2007 special election to replace Marty Meehan, Republican candidate Jim Ogonowski ran an unexpectedly strong race, ultimately losing 51-45%.

Cities and towns in the district

Cities and towns in the district since 2013

Map of the 5th congressional district (in purple), from 2013 to 2023
Map of Cambridge, noting Wards, Precincts and congressional districts, including the 5th district (in green) and the 7th district (in orange), starting in 2013.[3]

In Middlesex County:

Arlington, Ashland, Belmont, Cambridge: Ward 3 Precinct 2A, Ward 4 Precincts 2 and 3, Wards 6, 7, 8, and 9, Ward 10 Precincts 1 and 2, Framingham, Holliston, Lexington, Lincoln, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Natick, Sherborn, Stoneham, Sudbury: Precincts 1A, 2, 3, 4, and 5, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland, Weston, Winchester and Woburn.

In Suffolk County:

Revere, and Winthrop.

In Worcester County:

Southborough.

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013

1840s

"The towns of Ashburnham, Auburn, Barre, Brookfield, Charlton, Dana, Douglas, Dudley, Gardner, Grafton, Hardwick, Holden, Hubbardston, Leicester, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Northbridge, Oakham, Oxford, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, Princeton, Rutland, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Warren, Webster, West Boylston, Westminster, Winchendon, and Worcester, in the County of Worcester."[4]

1850s

"The wards numbered one, two, three, four, five, and six, in the city of Boston, and the towns of Chelsea and North Chelsea, and Winthrop, in the county of Suffolk; and the city of Cambridge, in the county of Middlesex."[5]

1870s

"Arlington, Belmont, Wards, 3, 4, and 5, Boston, Burlington, Everett, Lexington, Lynn, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Nahant, Saugus, Somerville, Stoneham, Swampscott, Wakefield, Waltham, Winchester, and Woburn."[6]

1880s-1900s

1910s

"Essex County: Towns of Andover and Methuen. Middlesex County: Cities of Lowell and Woburn; towns of Acton, Ayer, Bedford, Blllerica, Boxboro, Burlington, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Groton, Hudson, Lincoln, Littleton, Maynard, Pepperell, Reading, Shirley, Stow, Tewksbury, Tyngsboro, Westford, and Wilmington. Worcester County: Towns of Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, and Northboro."[7]

1920s-1960s

1970s

"Essex County: City of Lawrence. Towns of Andover and Methuen. Middlesex County: City of Lowell. Towns of Acton, Ashby, Bedford, Billerica, Boxborough, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Groton, Lexington, Littleton, North Reading, Pepperell, Tewksbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough, Westford, and Wilmington."[8]

2003-2013

The district from 2003 to 2013

In Essex County:

Andover, Haverhill, Lawrence, Methuen.

In Middlesex County:

Acton, Ayer, Billerica, Boxborough, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Groton, Hudson, Littleton, Lowell, Maynard, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury, Tewksbury, Tyngsborough, Wayland (Precincts 1, 3, and 4), Westford.

In Worcester County:

Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster.

Recent election results

U.S. House election, 1990: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Chester G. Atkins 110,232 49.85
Republican John MacGovern 101,017 45.68
Other 9,891 4.47
Turnout 221,140
Democratic hold Swing
U.S. House election, 1992: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 133,844 52.17 +2.32
Republican Paul W. Cronin 96,206 37.50 -8.18
Independent Mary Farinelli 19,077 7.44 +7.44
Independent David E. Coleman 7,214 2.81 +2.81
Write-in 223 0.09 -4.38
Turnout 256,564
Democratic hold Swing +2.32
U.S. House election, 1994: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 140,725 69.83 +17.66
Republican David E. Coleman 60,734 30.14 -7.36
Write-in 65 0.03 -0.06
Turnout 201,524
Democratic hold Swing +17.66
U.S. House election, 1996: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 183,429 99.08 +29.25
Republican Unopposed -30.14
Write-in 1,708 0.92 +0.89
Turnout 185,137
Democratic hold Swing +29.25
U.S. House election, 1998: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 127,418 70.70 -28.38
Republican David E. Coleman 52,725 29.25 +29.25
Write-in 87 0.05 -0.87
Turnout 180,230
Democratic hold Swing -28.38
U.S. House election, 2000: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 199,601 98.02 +27.32
Republican Unopposed -29.25
Write-in 4,040 1.98 +1.93
Turnout 203,641
Democratic hold Swing +27.32
U.S. House election, 2002: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Marty Meehan 122,562 60.15 -37.87
Republican Charles McCarthy 69,337 34.03 +34.03
Write-in 149 0.07 -1.91
Turnout 203,777
Democratic hold Swing -37.87
U.S. House election, 2004: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Write-in 305 0.11 +0.04
Turnout 268,189
Democratic hold Swing +6.84
U.S. House election, 2006: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Write-in 3,152 1.02 +0.91
Turnout 216,832
Democratic hold Swing +31.99
Special election, 2007: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent Patrick Murphy 2,170 2.05 +2.05
Independent Kurt Hayes 1,125 1.06 +1.06
Turnout 105,922
Democratic hold Swing -47.66
U.S. House election, 2008: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
All Others 2,960 1.29 -2.29
Turnout 302,397
Democratic hold Swing +37.39
U.S. House election, 2010: Massachusetts District 5
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
All Others 147 0.07 -1.22
Turnout 229,647
Democratic hold Swing -43.87

List of Representatives

Representative Party Years ↑ District home Electoral history
George Partridge Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1789 –
August 14, 1790
Duxbury Resigned
Vacant August 15, 1790 –
March 4, 1791
Shearjashub Bourne Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1791 –
March 4, 1793
Boston Redistricted to the 3rd district
District eliminated March 4, 1793 –
March 4, 1795
Nathaniel Freeman, Jr. Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1795 –
March 4, 1799
Sandwich
Lemuel Williams Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 4, 1803
New Bedford Redistricted to the 8th district
Thomas Dwight Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 4, 1805
Springfield
William Ely Federalist March 4, 1805 –
March 4, 1815
Springfield
Elijah H. Mills Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 4, 1819
Northampton Lost re-election
Samuel Lathrop Federalist March 4, 1819 –
March 4, 1823
West Springfield Redistricted to the 8th district
Jonas Sibley Adams-Clay
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 4, 1825
Sutton Lost re-election
John Davis Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 4, 1829
Worcester Resigned to become Governor of Massachusetts
National
Republican
March 4, 1829 –
January 14, 1834
Vacant January 15, 1834 –
February 16, 1834
Levi Lincoln, Jr. National
Republican
February 17, 1834 –
March 4, 1837
Worcester First elected to finish Davis's term
Resigned to become Collector of the Port of Boston
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 16, 1841
Vacant March 17, 1841 –
May 2, 1841
Charles Hudson Whig May 3, 1841 –
March 4, 1849
Westminster Lost re-election
Charles Allen Free Soil March 4, 1849 –
March 4, 1853
Worcester Redistricted to the 9th district
William Appleton Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 4, 1855
Boston Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected here in 1852
Lost re-election
Anson Burlingame American March 4, 1855 –
March 4, 1857
Boston
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 4, 1861
William Appleton Constitutional Unionist March 4, 1861 –
September 27, 1861
Boston Resigned because of failing health
Vacant September 28, 1861 –
December 1, 1861
Samuel Hooper[9] Republican December 2, 1861 –
March 4, 1863
Boston First elected to finish Davis's term
Redistricted to the 4th district
John B. Alley Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 4, 1867
Lynn Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected here in 1862
Benjamin F. Butler[10] Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 4, 1873
Lowell Redistricted to the 6th district
Daniel W. Gooch Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 4, 1875
Melrose Lost re-election
Nathaniel P. Banks[11] Independent March 4, 1875 –
March 4, 1877
Waltham First elected in 1874
Lost renomination
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 4, 1879
Selwyn Z. Bowman[12] Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 4, 1883
Somerville
Leopold Morse Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 4, 1885
Boston Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected here in 1882
Retired
Edward D. Hayden Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 4, 1889
Woburn Retired
Nathaniel P. Banks Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 4, 1891
Waltham Elected again in 1888
Retired
Sherman Hoar Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 4, 1893
Concord
Moses T. Stevens Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 4, 1895
North Andover Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected here in 1892
William S. Knox[13] Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 4, 1903
Lawrence Retired
Butler Ames[14] Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 4, 1913
Lowell Retired
John Jacob Rogers Republican March 4, 1913 –
March 28, 1925
Lowell Died
Vacant March 28, 1925 –
June 30, 1925
Edith Nourse Rogers[15] Republican June 30, 1925 –
September 10, 1960
Lowell First elected to finish her husband's term
Died
Vacant September 10, 1960 –
January 3, 1961
F. Bradford Morse[16] Republican January 3, 1961 –
May 1, 1972
Lowell Resigned to become U.N. Under Secretary General for Political and General Assembly Affairs
Vacant May 1, 1972 –
January 3, 1973
Paul W. Cronin Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1975
Andover Lost re-election
Paul Tsongas Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1979
Lowell Retired to run for U.S. Senate
James Shannon Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1985
Lawrence Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Chester G. Atkins[17] Democratic January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 1993
Concord Lost renomination
Marty Meehan Democratic January 3, 1993 –
July 1, 2007
Lowell Resigned to become Chancellor of University of Massachusetts Lowell
Vacant July 1, 2007 –
October 16, 2007
Niki Tsongas Democratic October 16, 2007 –
January 3, 2013
Lowell First elected to finish Meehan's term
Re-elected in 2008
Re-elected in 2010
Redistricted to the 3rd district
Ed Markey Democratic January 3, 2013 –
July 15, 2013
Malden Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected here in 2012
Resigned after being elected to the U.S. Senate.
Vacant July 15, 2013 –
December 10, 2013
Katherine Clark Democratic December 10, 2013 –
Present
Melrose Elected to finish Markey's term
Re-elected in 2014
Representative Party Years ↑ District home Electoral history

References

  1. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 28, 2012.
  2. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elespeif/repincongress5cal.htm
  3. ^ pdf
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

External links

Maps

  • Map of Massachusetts' 5th Congressional District, via Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth

Election results

  • CNN.com 2004 election results
  • CNN.com 2006 election results
  • Associated Press 2007 election results
  • Massachusetts Elections Division 2008 Return of Votes


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