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Massachusetts's 8th congressional district

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Title: Massachusetts's 8th congressional district  
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Subject: List of United States Representatives from Massachusetts, United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 1790, Massachusetts's 7th congressional district, Frederick W. Dallinger, Mike Capuano
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Massachusetts's 8th congressional district

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district
Massachusetts's 8th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Massachusetts's 8th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Stephen Lynch (DBoston)
Cook PVI D+9[1]

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district is located in eastern Massachusetts, including part of Boston. It is represented by Democrat Stephen Lynch. For one congressional term (1791-1793) it served as the home district of the District of Maine. The district boundaries are significantly changed as of the elections of 2012 due to redistricting after the 2010 census, with the old 8th district largely being shifted to the new 7th district.[2] The new 8th district comprises many of the communities of the old 9th district, as well as some easternmost Norfolk County communities and northernmost Plymouth County communities of the old 10th district.

Cities and towns in the District

In Bristol County:

Precincts 1 and 2 in Raynham.

In Norfolk County:

Avon, Braintree, Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton:Precincts 2-4, and 6-9, Norwood, Quincy, Stoughton, Walpole, Westwood and Weymouth.

In Plymouth County:

Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, East Bridgewater, Hingham, Hull, Scituate, West Bridgewater, and Whitman.

In Suffolk County:

Boston, Ward 3: Precincts 1-6; Ward 5: Precincts 3-5, 11; Ward 6, Ward 7: Precincts 1-9, Ward 11: Precincts 9 and 10, Ward 13: Precincts 3, 7 and 10, Ward 16: Precincts 2, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 12, Ward 19: Precincts 1-6, 8 and 8, and Ward 20: Precincts 1, 2, and 4-20.

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013

The district from 2003 to 2013
Massachusetts's 8th congressional district, 1891

1840s

"All the towns in Norfolk County; Abington, North Bridgewater, Hingham, and Hull, in the County of Plymouth; and Brighton, Holliston, Natick, Newton, and Sherburne, in the County of Middlesex."[3]

1850s

"The city of Lowell, and the towns of Acton, Ashby, Ashland, Bedford, Billerica, Boxborough, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Framingham, Groton, Hopkinton, Lincoln, Littleton, Marlborough, Natick, Pepperell, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury, Tewksbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough, Wayland. Westford, and Weston, in the county of Middlesex; and the towns of Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lunenburg, Northborough, Southborough, and Westborough, in the county of Worcester."[4]

1870s

"Ashland, Wards 22, 23, 25, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Dedham, Dover, Framingham, Franklin, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Milford, Natick, Needham, Newton, Norwood, Sherborn, Southboro', Watertown, Wayland, and Weston."[5]

1893-1902

1893: Arlington, Boston (Wards 9, 10, 11), Cambridge, Medford, Somerville, Winchester.[6]

1903-1912

Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Medford, Somerville, Winchester, Woburn.[7]

1913-1932

Middlesex County: Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Lexington, Medford, Melrose, Stoneham, Wakefield, Watertown, Winchester.[8][9]

1933-1942

Cambridge (Wards 2, 3), Everett, Malden, Medford, Somerville.[7]

1943-1962

Everett, Lynnfield, Malden, Medford, Melrose, N. Reading, Reading, Saugus, Somerville (Wards 4, 5, 6, 7), Stoneham, Wakefield.[7][10]

1963-1972

Boston (Wards 1, 2, 3, 21, 22), Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville.[7][11]

1973-1982

Arlington, Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 5, 21, 22), Cambridge, Somerville, Watertown.[7][12]

1983-1992

Arlington, Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 21, 22), Cambridge, Somerville, Waltham, Watertown.[7][13]

1993-2002

Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 22), Cambridge, Chelsea, Somerville, Watertown.[7]

2003-2013

In Middlesex County:

Cambridge, and Somerville.

In Suffolk County:

Boston, Wards 1, 2, Ward 3, Precincts 1-4, 7, 8, Ward 4, Ward 5, Precincts 1, 2, 6-10, Ward 7, Precinct 10, Wards 8-12, Ward 13, Precincts 1, 2, 4-6, Ward 14, Ward 15, Precincts 1-5, 7-9, Ward 16, Precincts 1, 3, Ward 17, Precincts 1-3, 5-12; Ward 18, Precincts 1-8, 13-15, 21, Ward 19, Precincts 1, 3-6, 8, 9, Wards 21 and 22, (the remainder of Boston is in the 9th district), and Chelsea.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Jonathan Grout Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
George Thatcher Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted from the 6th district.
Redistricted to the 4th district.
District eliminated 1793
District restored 1795
Fisher Ames Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
Redistricted from the 1st district.
Harrison Gray Otis Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1801
William Eustis Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Redistricted to the 1st district.
Lost re-election.
Lemuel Williams Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
Redistricted from the 5th district.
Isaiah L. Green Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1809
Gideon Gardner Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
Isaiah L. Green Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
John Reed, Jr. Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815

Redistricted to the 9th district.
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
Redistricted from the 7th district.
Zabdiel Sampson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
July 26, 1820

Resigned to become collector of customs in Plymouth.
Vacant July 26, 1820 –
November 24, 1820
Aaron Hobart Democratic-Republican November 24, 1820 –
March 3, 1823

Redistricted to the 11th district.
Samuel Lathrop Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Redistricted from the 5th district.
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Isaac C. Bates Adams March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1835
William B. Calhoun Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837

Retired.
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
John Quincy Adams Whig March 4, 1843 –
February 23, 1848
Redistricted from the 12th district.
Died.
Vacant February 24, 1848 –
April 2, 1848
Horace Mann Whig April 3, 1848 –
March 3, 1853
Tappan Wentworth Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Chauncey L. Knapp Know-nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Charles R. Train[14] Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
John D. Baldwin Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1869
[15] Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873

Redistricted to the 9th district.
John M. S. Williams Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
William W. Warren Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877

Lost re-election.
William Claflin[16] Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881

Retired.
John W. Candler Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
William A. Russell Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
Redistricted from the 7th district.
Charles H. Allen Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889

Retired.
Frederic T. Greenhalge Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891

Lost re-election.
Moses T. Stevens Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893

Redistricted to the 5th district.
Samuel W. McCall[17][18] Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1913
Frederick Simpson Deitrick Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
Frederick W. Dallinger Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1925
Harry I. Thayer Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 10, 1926
Elected in 1924.
Died.
Vacant March 10, 1926 –
November 2, 1926
Frederick W. Dallinger Republican November 2, 1926 –
October 1, 1932
First elected to finish Thayer's term and elected to next full term.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Resigned to become judge of United States Customs Court.
Vacant October 1, 1932 –
March 3, 1933
Arthur D. Healey[19] Democratic March 4, 1933 –
August 3, 1942
First elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Resigned to become judge of US District Court for Massachusetts.
Vacant August 3, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
Angier Goodwin Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1955
First elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Lost re-election.
Torbert H. Macdonald Democratic January 3, 1955 –
January 3, 1963
First elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to 7th district.
Tip O'Neill[20] Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1987
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected here in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Retired.
Joseph P. Kennedy II[21] Democratic January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1999
First elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired.
Mike Capuano Democratic January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2013
First elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to the 7th district.
Stephen Lynch Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected here in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.

Recent election results

2006 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Mike Capuano 125,167 91
Majority 112,777 82
Turnout 137,557
Democratic hold Swing

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 20, 2012.
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^ a b c d e f g (Includes geographical history of Massachusetts's 8th congressional district, pre-2013)
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

External links

Maps

  • Map of Massachusetts's 8th Congressional District, via Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth

Election results

  • CNN.com 2004 election results
  • CNN.com 2006 election results
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Oklahoma's 3rd congressional district
Home district of the Speaker of the House
January 4, 1977 – January 3, 1987
Succeeded by
Texas's 12th congressional district

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