World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Motion that brings a question again before the assembly

Article Id: WHEBN0016181401
Reproduction Date:

Title: Motion that brings a question again before the assembly  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Parliamentary procedure, Discharge a committee, Table (parliamentary procedure), Hoist (motion), Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure
Collection: Motions (Parliamentary Procedure)
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Motion that brings a question again before the assembly

Motions that bring a question again before the assembly are types of motions in parliamentary procedure that used to bring back a main motion. There are no order of precedence and can be introduced only when nothing else is pending.

Contents

  • Restoratory motions 1
    • Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure 1.1
    • Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised 1.2
    • The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure 1.3
  • References 2

Restoratory motions

Restoratory motions are a group of four to six similar motions (depending on the parliamentary authority) that do not belong in any of the three long-standing motion classes of subsidiary, privileged or incidental motions. These "restoratory" motions are quasi-main motions that restore the status quo of a question; that is, they bring a question back to its original status—as it was prior to the last vote on it.[1]

Restoratory motions (Demeter)

Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure

In 1969, Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, devised a new parliamentary term, "restoratory", for a group of six motions that restored or brought a question back before the assembly.[2] Previous to this time, various parliamentary manuals had referred to these individual motions as "unclassified," "miscellaneous," "certain other," or "specific" motions etc.

Bring a Question back motions (RONR)

Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised

Starting with the 7th edition[3] of Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, RONR grouped four similar motions under the classification name of Motions that bring a question again before the assembly, because by their adoption or by their introduction, they serve the function described by the name of the class.[4]

Restorative motions (TSC)

The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure

In its 4th edition, The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure classifies five "bring back" motions under the classification of main motions but lists them under the title of Restorative Main Motions.[5] Unlike RONR, TSC treats the motion to rescind and the motion to amend something previously adopted as two distinct motion forms under the Restorative Main Motion' title. The RONR motion to 'discharge a committee' is not used under TSC, because that manual allows a motion previously referred to committee to be withdrawn from the committee by the assembly. TSC does include the motion to ratify in this group; RONR classifies ratify as an incidental main motion.[6]

References

  1. ^ Demeter, George (1969). Demeter's Manual of Parliamentary Law and Procedure, Blue Book, p. 48
  2. ^ Demeter, p. 152
  3. ^ Robert, Henry M. (1970). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 7th ed., p. 64
  4. ^ Robert, Henry M. (2000). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 10th ed., p. 72–74
  5. ^ Sturgis, Alice (2001). The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, 4th ed., p. 16–17
  6. ^ RONR, p. 96


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.