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New York's 11th congressional district

 

New York's 11th congressional district

New York's 11th congressional district
New York 's 11th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
New York 's 11th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. (RStaten Island)
Ethnicity 73.3%% White, 8.2%% Black, 12.8%% Asian, 16.1%% Hispanic
Cook PVI R+2

New York's 11th Congressional District is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City.

The 11th district includes all of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn, including the neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Dyker Heights, and Gravesend. Politically, it is the most conservative district in New York City, the only district in the city which leans towards the Republican Party in national elections, and the only district covering part of the city to be represented by a Republican. The district has significant Jewish, Irish-American, Russian-American, and Italian-American populations.

From 2003-2013, the district was located entirely in Brooklyn, and had a majority African-American population. Most of the old 11th is now the 9th District. Prior to 2013, most of the territory currently in the 11th had been the 13th District.

The district was the subject of The Colbert Report's Better Know a District segment on December 15, 2005 and September 4, 2012.

On May 5, 2015 the 11th Congressional District of New York held a special election for the U.S. House of Representatives. The three major party candidates were Daniel Donovan (R), Vincent Gentile (D), and James Lane (G). Daniel Donovan (R) from Staten Island defeated his opponents in the special election gathering 58.7% of the vote.[1]

Contents

  • Recent election results 1
  • List of representatives 2
  • Election results 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Recent election results

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
1992 President Clinton 86 - 10%
1996 President Clinton 90 - 6%
2000 President Gore 83 - 9%
2004 President Kerry 86 - 13%
2008 President Obama 91 - 9%
2012 President Obama 52 - 47%

List of representatives

The 11th has historically been a Brooklyn-based district. In the 1992 redistricting much of the old 11th became the new 10th district and the new 11th absorbed much of the old 12th district. In the 2012 redistricting, the new 11th replaced most of the old 13th district, and covered Staten Island for the first time.

Representative Party Years Electoral history Geography
District created 1803
Beriah Palmer Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
Clinton, Essex and Saratoga counties
Peter Sailly Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
John Thompson Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
Thomas R. Gold Federalist March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
Clinton, Essex, Franklin and Saratoga counties
John W. Taylor Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1823
Redistricted to 17th district Saratoga County
Charles A. Foote Crawford
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Delaware and Greene counties
Henry Ashley Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Selah R. Hobbie Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
Perkins King Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
Erastus Root Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
John Cramer Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
Schenectady and Saratoga counties
John I. De Graff Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Anson Brown Whig March 4, 1839 –
June 14, 1840
Died
Vacant June 14, 1840 –
December 7, 1840
Nicholas B. Doe Whig December 7, 1840 –
March 3, 1841
Elected to finish Brown's term.
Archibald L. Linn Whig March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
Zadock Pratt Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Columbia and Greene counties
John F. Collin Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
Peter H. Silvester Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
Josiah Sutherland Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
Theodoric R. Westbrook Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Ulster County, New York and Greene County, New York
Rufus H. King Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
William F. Russell Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
William S. Kenyon Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
John B. Steele Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
Redistricted to 13th district
Charles H. Winfield Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
Orange and Sullivan counties
Charles Van Wyck Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
George W. Greene Democratic March 4, 1869 –
February 17, 1870
Charles Van Wyck Republican February 17, 1870 –
March 3, 1871
Successfully challenged election of George W. Greene
Charles St. John Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
Redistricted to 12th district
Clarkson N. Potter Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Redistricted from 10th district Bronx and Westchester County
Benjamin A. Willis Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
Harlem and central Manhattan
Levi P. Morton Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 21, 1881
Resigned to become US Minister to France
Vacant March 21, 1881 –
November 8, 1881
Roswell P. Flower Democratic November 8, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
Elected to finish Morton's term.
Orlando B. Potter Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
Truman A. Merriman Independent Democrat March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
West Central Manhattan
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
John Quinn Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
John De Witt Warner Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Redistricted to 13th district
Amos J. Cummings Democratic March 4, 1893 –
November 21, 1894
Redistricted from 9th district
Redistricted to 10th district
Lower East Side of Manhattan (part)
William Sulzer Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1903
Redistricted to 10th district
William Randolph Hearst Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
Part of Central west Manhattan
Charles V. Fornes Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1913
Daniel J. Riordan Democratic March 4, 1913 –
April 28, 1923
Redistricted from 8th district
Died
All of Staten Island, Parts of Manhattan
Vacant April 28, 1923 –
November 6, 1923
Anning Smith Prall Democratic November 6, 1923 –
January 3, 1935
Elected to finish Riordan's term.
James A. O'Leary Democratic January 3, 1935 –
March 16, 1944
Died
Vacant March 16, 1944 –
June 6, 1944
Ellsworth B. Buck Republican June 6, 1944 –
January 3, 1945
Elected to finish O'Leary's term.
Redistricted to 16th district
James J. Heffernan Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1953
Redistricted from 5th district Parts of Brooklyn
Emanuel Celler Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1963
Redistricted from 15th district
redistricted to 10th district
Parts of Brooklyn, Queens
Eugene J. Keogh Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1967
Redistricted from 9th district Parts of Brooklyn
Frank J. Brasco Democratic January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1971
January 3, 1971 –
January 3, 1975
Parts of Brooklyn, Queens
James H. Scheuer Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1983
Redistricted to 8th district
Edolphus Towns Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
Redistricted to the 10th district. Parts of Brooklyn
Major Owens Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2007
Redistricted from 12th district.

Retired.

Parts of Brooklyn
Yvette Clarke Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2013
First elected in 2006.

Redistricted to the 9th district.
Michael Grimm Republican January 3, 2013 –
January 5, 2015
Redistricted from 13th district

Resigned.
Staten Island and parts of Brooklyn
Vacant January 5, 2015 –
May 5, 2015
Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. Republican May 5, 2015 –
present
Elected to finish Grimm's term.

Election results

In New York State there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap"). (See Electoral fusion#New York.)

1996 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Major Owens 89,905 92.0
Republican Claudette Hayle 7,866 8.0
Majority 82,039 83.9
Turnout 97,771 100
1998 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Major Owens 75,773 90.0 -2.0
Republican David Greene 7,284 8.7 +0.7
Independence Phyllis Taliaferro 1,144 1.4 +1.4
Majority 68,489 81.3 -2.6
Turnout 84,201 100 -13.9
2000 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Major Owens 112,050 87.0 -3.0
Republican Susan Cleary 8,406 6.5 -2.2
Liberal Una S.T. Clarke 7,366 5.7 +5.7
Conservative Cartrell Gore 962 0.7 +0.7
Majority 103,644 80.5 -0.8
Turnout 128,784 100 +52.9
2002 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Major Owens 76,917 86.6 -0.4
Republican Susan Cleary 11,149 12.5 +6.0
Conservative Alice Gaffney 798 0.9 +0.2
Majority 65,768 74.0 -6.5
Turnout 88,864 100 -31.0
2004 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Major Owens 144,999 94.0 +7.4
Independence Lorraine Stevens 4,721 3.1 +3.1
Conservative Sol Lieberman 4,478 2.9 +2.0
Majority 140,278 91.0 +17.0
Turnout 154,198 100 +73.5
2006 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Yvette Clarke 88,334 90.0 -4.0
Republican Stephen Finger 7,447 7.6 +7.6
Conservative Marianna Blume 1,325 1.4 -1.5
Freedom Ollie M. McClean 996 1.0 +1.0
Majority 80,887 82.5 -8.5
Turnout 98,102 100 -36.4
2008 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Yvette Clarke 168,562 92.8 +2.8
Republican Hugh C. Carr 11,644 6.4 -1.2
Conservative Cartrell Gore 1,517 0.8 -0.6
Majority 156,918 86.4 +3.9
Turnout 181,723 100 +85.2
2010 election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Yvette Clarke 104,297 90.6 -2.2
Republican Hugh C. Carr 10,858 9.4 +3.0
Majority 93,439 81.1 -5.3
Turnout 115,155 100 -36.6

See also

References

  1. ^ "Special Election 2015: Final vote count, turnout, district breakdown". S.I. News. May 6, 2015. Retrieved May 6, 2015. 

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