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New York's 1st congressional district

 

New York's 1st congressional district

New York's 1st congressional district
 New York 's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
New York 's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Lee M. Zeldin (RShirley)
Distribution 93.89% urban, 6.11% rural
Population (2000) 654,360
Median income $61,884
Ethnicity 77.9[1]White, 4.9% Black, 3.7% Asian, 12.5% Hispanic, 1% other
Cook PVI R+2

The 1st Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in eastern Long Island. It includes most of Central and Eastern Suffolk County, including most of Smithtown, as well as the entirety of the towns of Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, East Hampton, and Shelter Island. The district encompasses extremely wealthy enclaves such as the Hamptons, middle class suburban towns such as Selden, Centereach and Lake Grove, working-class neighborhoods such as Mastic, Shirley, and Riverhead and rural farming communities such as Mattituck and Jamesport on the North Fork. The district currently is represented by Republican Lee Zeldin. Congressman Zeldin defeated Democrat Tim Bishop, who had represented the district since 2003, in the 2014 election.

The district was a battleground, as President John Kerry by less than a percentage point in 2004, while in 2008, President Barack Obama defeated John McCain 52%–48%.

In 2012, New York underwent redistricting, and the 1st District was slightly modified.

Contents

  • Voting 1
  • Communities within the district 2
  • Components: past and present 3
  • List of representatives 4
    • 1789–1813: one seat 4.1
    • 1813–1823: two seats 4.2
    • 1823–present: one seat 4.3
  • Election results 5
  • Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York's 1st congressional district 6
  • Historical district boundaries 7
  • See also 8
  • References 9

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
1992 President Bush 40–38%
1996 President Clinton 51–36%
2000 President Gore 52–44%
2004 President Bush 49–49%
2008 President Obama 52–48%
2012 President Obama 50–49%

Communities within the district

Components: past and present

1913–1945:

All of Suffolk, Nassau
Parts of Queens

1945–1963:

All of Suffolk
Parts of Nassau

1963–present:

Parts of Suffolk


List of representatives

1789–1813: one seat

Representative Party Years Congress Note
William Floyd Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
1
Vacant March 4, 1791 –
May 1791
2 Representative-elect James Townsend died May 24, 1790, before his term began.
Thomas Tredwell Anti-Administration May 1791 –
March 3, 1795
2
(Continued)
Elected in special election April 1791
3
Jonathan Nicoll Havens Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
October 25, 1799
4 Died
5
6
Vacant October 25, 1799 –
February 27, 1800
John Smith Democratic-Republican February 27, 1800 –
February 23, 1804
6
(Continued)
Resigned
7
8
Vacant February 23, 1804 –
November 5, 1804
Samuel Riker Democratic-Republican November 5, 1804 –
March 3, 1805
8
(Continued)
Eliphalet Wickes Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1807
9
Samuel Riker Democratic-Republican March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1809
10
Ebenezer Sage Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
11
12

1813–1823: two seats

From 1809 to 1823, two seats were apportioned, elected at-large on a general ticket.

Cong
ress
Years   Seat A   Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
13 March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
John Lefferts Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812

Ebenezer Sage Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812

14 March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
Henry Crocheron Democratic-Republican Elected in 1814

George Townsend Democratic-Republican Elected in 1814
15 March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
Tredwell Scudder Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816

Retired
Re-elected in 1816

16 March 4, 1819 –
January 14, 1820
Silas Wood Federalist First elected in 1818 Vacant Credentials had been issued for Ebenezer Sage (Dem.-Rep.), but Sage did not take or claim the seat, see United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 1818
January 14, 1820 –
March 3, 1821
James Guyon, Jr. Democratic-Republican Successfully contested the election of Ebenezer Sage

17 March 4, 1821 –
December 12, 1821
Re-elected in 1821

Became the sole representative from the district in 1823
Vacant Credentials had been issued for Peter Sharpe (Dem.-Rep.), but Sharpe did not take or claim the seat, see United States House of Representatives elections in New York, 1821
December 12, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Cadwallader D. Colden Federalist Successfully contested the election of Peter Sharpe

1823–present: one seat

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Silas Wood Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Re-elected in 1822

Lost re-election.
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
James Lent Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
February 22, 1833
Died.
Vacant February 22, 1833 –
March 4, 1833
Abel Huntington Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
Thomas B. Jackson Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
Retired.
Charles A. Floyd Democratic March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
Selah B. Strong Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Retired.
John W. Lawrence Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
Retired.
Frederick W. Lord Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
John Alsop King Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
John G. Floyd Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
James Maurice Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Retired.
William Valk Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Lost re-election.
John A. Searing Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Retired.
Luther C. Carter Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Lost re-election.
Edward H. Smith Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
Retired.
Henry G. Stebbins Democratic March 4, 1863 –
October 24, 1864
Resigned
Vacant October 24, 1864 –
December 5, 1864
Dwight Townsend Democratic December 5, 1864 –
March 3, 1865
Stephen Taber Democratic March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1869
Henry A. Reeves Democratic March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
Dwight Townsend Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
Henry J. Scudder Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Retired.
Henry B. Metcalfe Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
James W. Covert Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881
Perry Belmont Democratic March 4, 1881 –
December 1, 1888
Resigned to become U.S. Minister to Spain.
Vacant December 1, 1888 –
March 4, 1889
James W. Covert Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1895
Richard C. McCormick Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
Retired.
Joseph M. Belford Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
Retired.
Townsend Scudder Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
Retired.
Frederic Storm Republican March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
Lost re-election.
Townsend Scudder Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
Retired.
William W. Cocks Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1911
Lost re-election.
Martin W. Littleton Democratic March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1913
Retired.
Lathrop Brown Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
Lost re-election.
Frederick C. Hicks Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1923
Retired.
Robert L. Bacon Republican March 4, 1923 –
September 12, 1938
Died.
Vacant September 12, 1938 –
January 3, 1939
Leonard W. Hall Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1945
Redistricted to the 2nd congressional district.
Edgar A. Sharp Republican January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
Retired.
W. Kingsland Macy Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1951
Lost re-election.
Ernest Greenwood Democratic January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1953
Lost re-election.
Stuyvesant Wainwright Republican January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1961
Lost re-election.
Otis G. Pike Democratic January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1979
Retired.
William Carney William Carney Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1987
Retired.
George J. Hochbrueckner Democratic January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1995
Lost re-election.
Michael Forbes Republican January 3, 1995 –
July 17, 1999
Lost renomination.
Democratic July 17, 1999 –
January 3, 2001
Felix Grucci Republican January 3, 2001 –
January 3, 2003
Lost re-election.
Tim Bishop Democratic January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2015
Lost re-election.
Lee Zeldin Republican January 3, 2015 –
Present
First elected in 2014.

Election results

Note that in New York State electoral politics there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

US House election, 1996: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael P. Forbes 116,620 54.7
Democratic Nora L. Bredes 96,496 45.3
Majority 20,124 9.4
Turnout 213,116 100
US House election, 1998: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael P. Forbes 99,460 64.1 9.4
Democratic William G. Holst 55,630 35.9 9.4
Majority 43,830 28.3 18.9
Turnout 155,090 100 27.2
US House election, 2000: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Felix Grucci 133,020 55.5 8.6
Democratic Regina Seltzer 97,299 40.6 4.7
None Michael P. Forbes 6,318 2.6 2.6
Green William G. Holst 2,967 1.2 1.2
Majority 35,721 14.9 13.4
Turnout 239,604 100 54.5
US House election, 2002: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 84,276 50.2 9.6
Republican Felix Grucci 81,524 48.6 6.9
Green Lorna Salzman 1,991 1.2 0.0
Majority 2,752 1.6 13.3
Turnout 167,791 100 30.0
US House election, 2004: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 156,354 56.2 6.0
Republican William M. Manger, Jr. 121,855 43.8 4.8
Majority 34,499 12.4 10.8
Turnout 278,209 100 65.8
US House election, 2006: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 104,360 62.2 6.0
Republican Italo Zanzi 63,328 37.8 6.0
Majority 41,032 24.5 12.1
Turnout 167,688 100 39.7
US House election, 2008: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 162,083 58.4 3.8
Republican Lee M. Zeldin 115,545 41.6 3.8
Majority 46,538 16.8 7.7
Turnout 277,628 100 65.6
US House election, 2010: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 98,316 50.2 8.2
Republican Randy Altschuler 97,723 49.8 8.2
Majority 593 0.4 16.4
Turnout 196,039 100 29.4
US House election, 2012: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 132,525 52.2 2.0
Republican Randy Altschuler 121,478 47.8 2.0
Majority 11,047 4.3 3.9
Turnout 254,003 100 22.8

Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York's 1st congressional district

As of May 2015, five former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York's 1st congressional district are alive.

Representative Term of office Date of birth (and age)
William Carney 1979–1987 (1942-07-01) July 1, 1942
George J. Hochbrueckner 1987–1995 (1938-09-20) September 20, 1938
Michael Forbes 1995–2001 (1952-07-16) July 16, 1952
Felix Grucci 2001–2003 (1951-11-25) November 25, 1951
Tim Bishop 2003–2015 (1950-06-01) June 1, 1950

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "New York Redistricting—District One". New York Redistricting. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • "House Map 2012". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 November 2012. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  • National atlas congressional maps
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