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North Carolina's 2nd congressional district

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Title: North Carolina's 2nd congressional district  
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Subject: Bob Etheridge, Renee Ellmers, James E. O'Hara, List of African-American United States Representatives, George Henry White
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North Carolina's 2nd congressional district

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district
North Carolina's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
North Carolina's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Renee Ellmers (RDunn)
Distribution 49.45% urban, 50.55% rural
Population (2000) 619,178
Median income $36,510
Ethnicity 61.8% White, 30.4% Black, 0.6% Asian, 7.9% Hispanic, 0.9% Native American, 0.3% other
Cook PVI R+11[1]

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district is located in the central and eastern parts of the state. Today, the district, which is represented by Republican Rep. Renee Ellmers, includes all or parts of Alamance, Chatham, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Moore, Randolph and Wake counties.

Established by the state legislature after the American Civil War, the district was known as "The

  • Congresswoman Ellmers's official website

External links

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 
  2. ^ Black Americans in Congress
  3. ^ Race and Politics in North Carolina, 1872-1901: The Black SecondEric Anderson,
  4. ^ NCpedia: Disfranchisement

References

See also

2003 - 2013

Historical district boundaries

Representative Party Years District Residence Note
Hugh Williamson Anti-Administration March 19, 1790 – March 3, 1791 Redistricted to the 4th district
Nathaniel Macon Anti-Administration March 4, 1791 – March 3, 1793 Redistricted to the 5th district
Matthew Locke Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 – March 3, 1799
Archibald Henderson Federalist March 4, 1799 – March 3, 1803
Willis Alston Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1815 Redistricted from the 9th district
Joseph H. Bryan Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1819
Vacant March 4, 1819 – December 5, 1819
Hutchins G. Burton Democratic-Republican December 6, 1819 – March 3, 1823 Resigned after being elected Governor of North Carolina
Crawford D-R March 4, 1823 – March 23, 1824
Vacant March 24, 1824 – January 18, 1825
George Outlaw Crawford D-R January 19, 1825 – March 3, 1825 Bertie
Willis Alston Jacksonian March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1831 Halifax
John Branch Jacksonian May 12, 1831 – March 3, 1833
Jesse A. Bynum Jacksonian March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837 Halifax
Democratic March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1841
John Daniel Democratic March 4, 1841 – March 3, 1843 Halifax Redistricted to the 7th district
Daniel M. Barringer Whig March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1847 Redistricted to the 3rd district
Nathaniel Boyden Whig March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849 Salisbury Retired
Joseph P. Caldwell Whig March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1853 Statesville Retired
Thomas H. Ruffin Democratic March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1861
Civil War and Reconstruction
David Heaton Republican July 25, 1868 – June 25, 1870 Died
Vacant June 26, 1870 – December 4, 1870
Joseph Dixon Republican December 5, 1870 – March 3, 1871 Retired
Charles Thomas Republican March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1875 Lost renomination
John A. Hyman Republican March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877 Lost renomination to immediate past governor
Curtis H. Brogden Republican March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1879 Wayne Retired
William H. Kitchin Democratic March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881 Lost re-election
Orlando Hubbs Republican March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1883 New Bern Retired
James E. O'Hara Republican March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1887 Lost re-election
Furnifold M. Simmons Democratic March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1889 Lost re-election
Henry P. Cheatham Republican March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1893 Vance Lost re-election
Frederick A. Woodard Democratic March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1897 Lost re-election
George H. White Republican March 4, 1897 – March 3, 1901 New Bern Retired after state passage of 1900 disfranchisement constitution, which suppressed black voters for more than 60 years
Claude Kitchin Democratic March 4, 1901 – May 31, 1923 Died
Vacant June 1, 1923 – November 5, 1923
John H. Kerr Democratic November 6, 1923 – January 3, 1953 Lost renomination
L. H. Fountain Democratic January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1983 Retired
Tim Valentine Democratic January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1995 Retired
David Funderburk Republican January 3, 1995 – January 3, 1997 Lost re-election
Bob Etheridge Democratic January 3, 1997 – January 3, 2011 Lillington Lost re-election
Renee Ellmers Republican January 3, 2011 – present Dunn

List of representatives

Contents

  • List of representatives 1
  • Historical district boundaries 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

State redistricting following census changes led to the creation of the black-majority 1st and 12th districts and drew off some black population from the 2nd. Today the proportion of African-American residents is about 30.4% in the 2nd District.

Thousands of blacks migrated north from the state in the Great Migration during the first half of the twentieth century, seeking job opportunities and education. By the later twentieth century, before the 1990s, the 2nd district was roughly 40% black. While it had the highest percentage of black residents of any congressional district in North Carolina, African-American candidates were unable to get elected to Congress from the majority-white district.

After North Carolina Democrats regained control of the state legislature in the 1870s (using intimidation by the Red Shirts and other paramilitary groups to reduce the number of blacks voting), they passed voter registration and electoral laws that restricted voter rolls. Blacks continued to get elected to local and state offices. The state legislature passed a new constitutional amendment in 1900, which effectively disfranchised blacks altogether.[4] This ended the election of blacks to local, state or Congressional offices until after passage of federal civil rights legislation in the mid-1960s, which enforced constitutional voting rights.

. William Woods Holden of Wayne County, a Republican ally of former Governor Curtis Hooks Brogden as did white yeoman farmer [3][2]

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