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Outline of anthropology

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Outline of anthropology

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to anthropology:

Anthropology – study of humanity. Anthropology has origins in the natural sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences.[1] The term was first used by François Péron when discussing his encounters with Tasmanian Aborigines.[2]

What type of thing is anthropology?

Anthropology can be described as all of the following:

  • Academic discipline – body of knowledge given to - or received by - a disciple (student); a branch or sphere of knowledge, or field of study, that an individual has chosen to specialise in.
  • Field of science – widely-recognized category of specialized expertise within science, and typically embodies its own terminology and nomenclature. Such a field will usually be represented by one or more scientific journals, where peer reviewed research is published. There are many sociology-related scientific journals.
  • Social science – field of academic scholarship that explores aspects of human society.

History of anthropology

History of anthropology

Fields of anthropology

Archaeological and biological subfields

Linguistics subfields

Socio-cultural anthropology subfields

General anthropology concepts

Methods and frameworks

Anthropology scholars

Anthropology organizations

Anthropology lists

See also

Related fields

References

  1. ^ Wolf, Eric (1994) Perilous Ideas: Race, Culture, People. Current Anthropology 35: 1-7. p.227
  2. ^ Flannery, T.F. (1994) The Future Eaters: An ecological history of the Australasian lands and people Chatswood: New South Wales ISBN 0-8021-3943-4

External links

  • American Anthropological Association (AAA): What is Anthropology?
  • National Association for the Practice of Anthropology (NAPA): The Profession of Anthropology
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