World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Practical effect

Article Id: WHEBN0000580287
Reproduction Date:

Title: Practical effect  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Kerner Optical, 2D to 3D conversion, Master shot, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Mad Men), Film crew
Collection: Special Effects
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Practical effect

A location shot for The Black Dahlia with a rainmaking rig, a sprinkler system used to create the appearance of rain—a common practical effect

A practical effect is a special effect produced physically, without computer-generated imagery or other post production techniques. "Special effect" is often synonymous with "practical effect." In contrast, visual effects are created in post-production through photographic manipulation or computer generation.

Many of the staples of action movies are practical effects. Gunfire, bullet wounds, rain, wind, fire, and explosions can all be produced on a movie set by someone skilled in practical effects.

Practical effect techniques

  • The use of prosthetic makeup, animatronics, puppetry or suitmation to create the appearance of living creatures.
  • Miniature effects, which is the use of scale models which are photographed in a way that they appear full sized.
  • Mechanical Effects, such as aerial rigging to simulate flight, stage mounted gimbals to make the ground move, or other mechanical devices to physically manipulate the environment.
  • Pyrotechnics for the appearance of fire and explosions.
  • Weather effects such as sprinkler systems to create rain and fog machines to create smoke.
  • Squibs to create the illusion of gunshot wounds.

See also


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.