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Relations between Japanese Revolutionaries and the Comintern and the Soviet Union

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Title: Relations between Japanese Revolutionaries and the Comintern and the Soviet Union  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Japanese Communist Party, Japanese Resistance, Comintern, Japan–Soviet Union relations, United Red Army
Collection: Comintern, Japanese Communist Party, Japanese Resistance, Japanese Revolutionaries, Japan–soviet Union Relations
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Relations between Japanese Revolutionaries and the Comintern and the Soviet Union

Relations between Japanese Revolutionaries and the Comintern and the Soviet Union have existed since the 1920s.

Contents

  • First contact 1
  • 1920s-1945 2
  • Post-war period 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6

First contact

The Comintern made its first attempt to establish contact with Japanese leftists in 1920. Its agents sent a Korean named Yi Ch'un-suk to meet Japanese bolsheviks and Anarcho-syndicalists. Hitoshi Yamakawa, and Osugi Sakae declined his invitation to attend the "Far Eastern revolutionaries" in Shanghai, because both of them were reluctant to trust Yi, and were also cautious of the police. However, Osugi accepted Yi's invitation and secretly left Japan for Shanghai in October 1920. Osugi requested the Comintern to fund 10,000 yen to his publishing activities. The Comintern agreed to give him 2,000 yen. He returned to Japan, but the Comintern cut off relations with Osugi due to his anti-bolshevik, and anti-Soviet stance. The Comintern sent another agent, a Korean named Yi Chung-rim, in a second attempt to establish contact with left-wing leaders. The agent turned to Yamakawa who was ready to accept Soviet support and was agreeable to the establishment of "a Japanese branch of the Comintern."[1]

1920s-1945

The Japanese Communist Party had close relations with the Comintern. The Comintern exercised great authority over the JCP. Comintern money provided the majority of JCP funds. Funding would cease following the arrest of the Comintern's Shanghai representative, and when contact with the JCP, and the Comintern was temporarily lost. Contact between the Comintern, and the JCP would continue until the JCP's virtual destruction in 1935.[2] The Soviet embassy were uneasy when the Japanese media's coverage on alleged financial ties between the JCP and the Soviet government, which the Japanese government identified closely with the Comintern. The Soviet Embassy called the Japanese government's claim that the Soviets were funding the JCP unsubstantiated.[3]

Without the legal consent of the Japanese government, the Soviet Union solicited working-class Japanese to study at the Communist University of the Toilers of the East (KUTV) (called "Kutobe" by the Japanese). Between 1923 and 1926, some 43 Japanese Communists traveled to Moscow via Shanghai and Vladivostok in order to train at the KUTV.[4][5][6]

Before, during, and after the Great Purge, the Soviet Union arrested, and/or executed Japanese revolutionaries residing in the USSR who were suspected of anti-Soviet subversiveness. Only Yasu Katayama, the first daughter of Sen Katayama, and Sanzo Nosaka, leader of the JCP, were the only Japanese who were not arrested or purged.[7]

Post-war period

Following the end of World War II, the Japanese Communist Party was split between pro- Soviet, and pro-Chinese factions. By the 1960s, the JCP was dominated by Pro‐Chinese party members. In 1964, Yoshio Shiga, Ichizo Suzuki, Shigeo Kamiyama, Shigeharu Nakano, were ousted from the JCP's Central Committee for taking pro-Soviet positions on the nuclear test‐ban treaty.[8][9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Beckmann, George M., and Genji Okubo. The Japanese Communist Party 1922-1945. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1969. pp 30-55
  2. ^ Tim, Rees, and Thorpe, Andrew. International Communism and the Communist International, 1919-43 Manchester University Press, 1998.
  3. ^ Yukiko Koshiro (2013). Imperial Eclipse: Japan's Strategic Thinking about Continental Asia before August 1945. Cornell University Press. pp. 15–45. 
  4. ^ Beckmann, George M., and Genji Okubo. The Japanese Communist Party 1922-1945. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1969. pp 30-55
  5. ^ Tim, Rees, and Thorpe, Andrew. International Communism and the Communist International, 1919-43 Manchester University Press, 1998.
  6. ^ Yukiko Koshiro (2013). Imperial Eclipse: Japan's Strategic Thinking about Continental Asia before August 1945. Cornell University Press. p. 30. 
  7. ^ Kato, Tetsuro (July 2000). The Japanese Victims of Stalinist Terror in the USSR (PDF). Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies 32 (1). 
  8. ^ "4 JAPANESE REDS PLAN NEW GROUP - nytimes". New York Times. 1964-10-04. 
  9. ^ Scalapino, Robert A. The Japanese Communist Movement: 1920-1966 London, England: Cambridge University Press. 1967.

Further reading

  • Paul Langer and Rodger Swearingen. "The Japanese Communist Party, the Soviet Union and Korea" Pacific Affairs . Vol. 23, No. 4 (Dec., 1950).
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