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Robert I of France

Robert I
King of Western Francia
King of the Franks (more...)
Reign 29 June 922 – 15 June 923
Coronation 29 June 922, Rheims
Predecessor Charles the Simple
Successor Rudolph of France
Born (866-08-15)15 August 866
Died 15 June 923(923-06-15) (aged 56)
Soissons, France
Issue Emma of France
Adel of France
Hugh the Great
House Robertian
Father Robert the Strong
Mother Adelaide of Tours

Robert I of France (866–923) was the king of West Francia from 922 to 923. Before his succession to the kingdom he was Count of Poitiers, Count of Paris and Marquis of Neustria and Orléans. He succeeded the Carolingian king Charles the Simple, who in 898 had succeeded Robert’s brother Odo.

Contents

  • Life 1
  • Family 2
  • References 3
  • See also 4

Life

Robert was born in 866 the posthumous son of Robert the Strong, count of Anjou, and the brother of Odo, who became king of the Western Franks in 888.[1] West Francia evolved over time into France;[2] under Odo, the capital was fixed on Paris, a large step in that direction. Robert and Odo's family is known as the Robertians.[3]

Robert was present at the Siege of Paris in 885.[4] He was appointed by Odo as the ruler of several counties, including the county of Paris, and abbot in commendam of many abbeys. Robert also secured the office of Dux Francorum, a military dignity of high importance. He did not claim the crown of West Francia when his brother died in 898; instead recognized the supremacy of the Carolingian king, Charles the Simple. Charles then confirmed Robert in his offices and possessions, after which he continued to defend northern Francia from the attacks of the Norsemen. Robert defeated a large band of Norse in the Loire Valley in 921, and the defeated invaders converted to Christianity and settled near Nantes.[5]

The peace between the king and his powerful vassal was not seriously disturbed until about 921. The rule of Charles, and especially his partiality for a certain Hagano, had aroused some irritation; and, supported by many of the clergy and by some of the most powerful of the Frankish nobles, Robert took up arms, drove Charles into Lorraine, and was himself crowned king of the Franks (rex Francorum) at Rheims on 29 June 922.[6] Robert's rule was contested by the Viking leader Rollo, who had settled in Normandy in 911 with the permission of Charles the Simple. During Robert's reign, Rollo remained loyal to Charles, who continued to contest his deposition.[5] Collecting an army, Charles marched against the usurper and, on 15 June 923, in a battle near Soissons, Robert was killed, but his army won the battle, and Charles was captured.[7] Charles remained a captive until his death in 929. Robert was succeeded as king by his son-in-law Rudolph, Count of Burgundy, also known as Raoul.[8]

Family

Robert's first wife was Aelis.[9] By her he had two daughters:

Robert married secondly, c. 890, Béatrice of Vermandois, daughter of Herbert I of Vermandois.[1] Together they had :

References

  1. ^ a b c Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 10
  2. ^ Colin Jones, The Cambridge Illustrated History of France (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), p. 74
  3. ^ Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: kings of France, 987-1328 (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), p. 34
  4. ^ Robert F. Berkhofer, Day of Reckoning: Power and Accountability in Medieval France (Philadelphia, Pa. University of Pennsylvania Press 2004). p. 29
  5. ^ a b Roger Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000, Second Edition (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), pp. 376-7
  6. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), pp. 6-7
  7. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), pp. 7-8
  8. ^ Roger Collins, Early Medieval Europe, 300–1000, Second Edition (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), p. 361
  9. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. 92
  10. ^ a b Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 49
  11. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), pp. 21 n. 77, 92
  12. ^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 11

See also

  •  

Preceded by
Charles the Simple
King of Western Francia
922–923
Succeeded by
Rudolph
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