World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Simran

Article Id: WHEBN0000561681
Reproduction Date:

Title: Simran  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Sikh practices, Bhai Trilochan Singh Panesar, Sikh philosophy, Sikhism, Outline of Sikhism
Collection: Sant Mat, Sikh Philosophical Concepts, Spirituality
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Simran

Simran (Punjabi: ਸਿਮਰਨ, Hindi: सिमरन ) is a Punjabi word derived from the Sanskrit word स्मरण (smaraṇa, "the act of remembrance , remembrance, reminiscence, recollection") which leads to the realization of that which is of the highest aspect and purpose in one's life. It is the continuous remembrance of the finest aspect of the self, or the continuous remembrance (or feeling) of God, thus used for introducing spirituality. This state is maintained continuously while carrying out the worldly works outside.[1]

Contents

  • Gurmukhi 1
  • Sant Mat 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Gurmukhi

Simran is a commonly used term as a verb in Gurmukhi, which refers to 'meditating' of the Nām, the ultimate feeling of Ultimate. Sikhism is a distinct contemporary faith, whereby the Realization of God can be realized purely through the individual devotion, without being succumbed to rites and rituals that has recently become a business of avaricious priests(however such belief could malign the pure search in sikhism ).

It says in the Guru Granth Sahib that through Simran one is purified and attains salvation or 'mukti'. This is because 'si-mar' means 'to die over', thus indicating to death of ego, allowing truth ultimate truth or sat to appear.

On page 202 of the Guru Granth Sahib, Guruji writes:

Meditating, meditating in remembrance, I have found peace.
(simar simar sukh paa-i-aa.)

This japna teaches a person who wishes to gain from this human life, one must attain a higher spiritual state by become free of attachment by realizing that all that is, is empty as outlined in the Heart Sutra. Thereby, merit is acquired by devoutly repeating, comprehending and living by the sacred word every day so as to progressively reveal the divine and ultimate truth to the person who earnestly seeks it:

Guru Ram Das says in Sarang ki var (Guru Granth Sahib, 1242):

Nām, the incorruptible is beyond our comprehending. At the same time, it is our constant companion and preserves all creation. Therefore, truth will disclose itself unto us and lets us perceive it in our hearts. It is through earnestness that we can meet with such a truth.

Sant Mat

In Sant Mat the word Simran is used for the spiritual practice of repeating the mantra given by the Satguru during initiation. The mantra itself is also called Simran. Simran repetition is done during meditation and also outside it.,[2] however this mantra is later dropped in favor of real feeling of self or the God, which happens due to breaking out of monotony through Jap. Thus mantra is used only till the point, monotony and previously formed patterns are broken. After it pure Simran is carried by the sadhak.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ek Omkaar Satnam Audio Discourse
  2. ^ Simran What it means and its uses, by Kirpal Singh.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.