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South of Scotland (Scottish Parliament electoral region)

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Title: South of Scotland (Scottish Parliament electoral region)  
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Subject: List of female Members of the Scottish Parliament, Scottish Parliament election, 2007, Alasdair Morgan, Aileen Campbell, Graeme Pearson
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South of Scotland (Scottish Parliament electoral region)

South of Scotland is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. Nine of the parliament's 73 first past the post constituencies are sub-divisions of the region and it elects seven of the 56 additional-member Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs). Thus it elects a total of 16 MSPs.

The region has boundaries with the West of Scotland, Central Scotland and Lothians regions.

Constituencies and council areas

The constituencies were created in 1999 with the names and boundaries of Westminster constituencies, as existing in at that time.[1] They cover all of three council areas,[2] the Scottish Borders council area, the Dumfries and Galloway council area and the South Ayrshire council area, and parts of five others, the East Ayrshire council area, the East Lothian council area, the Midlothian council area, the North Ayrshire council area and the South Lanarkshire council area:

Constituency Map
  1. Ayr
  2. Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley
  3. Clydesdale
  4. Cunninghame South
  5. Dumfries
  6. East Lothian
  7. Galloway and Upper Nithsdale
  8. Roxburgh and Berwickshire
  9. Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale

The rest of the East Ayrshire council area is within the Central Scotland electoral region, the rest of the East Lothian and Midlothian council areas are within the Lothians region, the rest of the North Ayrshire council area is within the West of Scotland region and the rest of the South Lanarkshire council area is divided between the Central Scotland and Glasgow regions.

Members of the Scottish Parliament

Constituency MSPs

Term Election Ayr Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley Clydesdale Galloway and Upper Nithsdale Dumfries Roxburgh and Berwickshire Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale East Lothian Cunninghame South
1st 1999 Ian Welsh
(Labour)
Cathy Jamieson
(Labour)
Karen Gillon
(Labour)
Alasdair Morgan
(SNP)
Elaine Murray
(Labour)
Euan Robson
(LD)
Ian Jenkins
(LD)
John Home Robertson
(Labour)
Irene Oldfather
(Labour)
2000 by John Scott
(Conservative)
2nd 2003 Alex Fergusson
(Conservative)
Jeremy Purvis
(LD)
3rd 2007 John Lamont
(Conservative)
Iain Gray
(Labour)

Regional List MSPs

N.B. This table is for presentation purposes only

Parliament MSP MSP MSP MSP MSP MSP MSP
1st
(1999–2003)
Christine Grahame
(SNP)
Adam Ingram
(SNP)
Michael Russell
(SNP)
Alex Fergusson
(Conservative)
Murray Tosh
(Conservative)
David Mundell
(Conservative)
Phil Gallie
(Conservative)
2nd
(2003–07)
Alasdair Morgan
(SNP)
Rosemary Byrne
(Socialist)
Chris Ballance
(Green)
Derek Brownlee
(Conservative)
3rd
(2007–11)
Michael Russell
(SNP)
Aileen Campbell
(SNP)
Jim Hume
(Lib Dem)

Election results

2007 Scottish Parliament election

In the 2007 Scottish Parliament election the region elected MSPs as follows:

Constituency results

Scottish Parliament election, 2007: South of Scotland
Constituency Elected member Result
Ayr John Scott Conservative hold
Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley Cathy Jamieson Labour hold
Clydesdale Karen Gillon Labour hold
Cunninghame South Irene Oldfather Labour hold
Dumfries Elaine Murray Labour hold
East Lothian Iain Gray Labour hold
Galloway and Upper Nithsdale Alex Fergusson Conservative hold
Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale Jeremy Purvis Liberal Democrats hold

Additional member results

Scottish Parliament election, 2007: South of Scotland
Party Elected candidates Seats +/− Votes % +/−%
Labour 0 0 79,762 28.8% -1.2%

2003 Scottish Parliament election

In the 2003 Scottish Parliament election the region elected MSPs as follows:

Constituency results

Scottish Parliament election, 2003: South of Scotland
Constituency Elected member Result
Ayr John Scott Conservative
Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley Cathy Jamieson Labour
Clydesdale Karen Gillon Labour
Cunninghame South Irene Oldfather Labour
Dumfries Elaine Murray Labour
East Lothian John Home Robertson Labour
Galloway and Upper Nithsdale Alex Fergusson Conservative
Roxburgh and Berwickshire Euan Robson Liberal Democrats
Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale Jeremy Purvis Liberal Democrats

Additional member results

Scottish Parliament election, 2003: South of Scotland
Party Elected candidates Seats +/− Votes % +/−%

Changes

1999 Scottish Parliament election

In the 1999 Scottish Parliament election the region elected MSPs as follows:

Constituency results

Scottish Parliament election, 1999: South of Scotland
Constituency Elected member Result
Ayr Ian Welsh Labour win (new seat)
Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley Cathy Jamieson Labour win (new seat)
Clydesdale Karen Turnbull Labour win (new seat)
Cunninghame South Irene Oldfather Labour win (new seat)
Dumfries Elaine Murray Labour win (new seat)
East Lothian John Home Robertson Labour win (new seat)
Galloway and Upper Nithsdale Alasdair Morgan SNP win (new seat)
Roxburgh and Berwickshire Euan Robson Liberal Democrats win (new seat)
Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale Ian Jenkins Liberal Democrats win (new seat)

Changes:

  • On 21 December 1999 Ian Welsh resigned, citing family reasons. He was the first MSP to resign, and as of 2005 remains the shortest serving MSP serving 230 days. At the subsequent Ayr by-election in 2000, John Scott won the seat for the Conservatives.

Additional member results

Scottish Parliament election, 1999: South of Scotland
Party Elected candidates Seats +/− Votes % +/−%

Notes and references

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