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Stenosis

Stenosis
CT scan of a bronchial stenosis (arrow) that resulted from tracheobronchial injury
Classification and external resources
MeSH D003251

A stenosis (;[1][2] urethral stricture).[3]

Stricture as a term is usually used when narrowing is caused by contraction of smooth muscle (e.g., achalasia, prinzmetal angina); stenosis is usually used when narrowing is caused by lesion that reduces the space of lumen (e.g., atherosclerosis). The term coarctation is another synonym,[4] but is commonly used only in the context of aortic coarctation.

Restenosis is the recurrence of stenosis after a procedure.

Contents

  • Diagnosis 1
  • Causes 2
  • Types 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Diagnosis

Stenoses of the vascular type are often associated with unusual blood sounds resulting from turbulent flow over the narrowed blood vessel. This sound can be made audible by a stethoscope, but diagnosis is generally made or confirmed with some form of medical imaging.

Causes

Types

The resulting syndrome depends on the structure affected.

Examples of vascular stenotic lesions include:

The types of stenoses in heart valves are:

Stenoses/strictures of other bodily structures/organs include:

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ OED 2nd edition, 1989, as /stɪˈnəʊsɪs/.
  2. ^ Entry "stenosis" in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary.
  3. ^ "Dorlands Medical Dictionary:stenosis". www.mercksource.com. Retrieved 2010-05-05. 
  4. ^ "coarctation" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary

External links

  • Tracheal Stenosis Audio and Video
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