World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Strip mall

Article Id: WHEBN0000570169
Reproduction Date:

Title: Strip mall  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of shopping malls in Greater Longueuil, Julie Brown, Karen Maruyama, Jim O'Heir, Fort Ord
Collection: Retailing, Shopping Malls, Urban Studies and Planning Terminology
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Strip mall

Example of a small strip mall in Wynantskill, New York

A strip mall (also called a shopping plaza, shopping center, or mini-mall) is an open-air shopping mall where the stores are arranged in a row, with a sidewalk in front. Strip malls are typically developed as a unit and have large parking lots in front. They face major traffic arterials and tend to be self-contained with few pedestrian connections to surrounding neighborhoods.

Contents

  • Mall types 1
  • Architectural styles 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Mall types

A strip mall in Santa Clara, California.

In the U.S. and Canada, strip malls usually range in size from 5,000 square feet (460 m2) to over 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2). The smaller variety is more common and often located at the intersection of major streets in residential areas; it caters to a small residential area.[1] This type of strip mall is found in nearly every city or town in the U.S. and Canada; it is service-oriented and may contain a grocery store, salons, dry cleaner, small restaurant, and similar stores. In the past, pharmacies were often located next to the grocery stores, but are now often free-standing or contained within the anchor tenant (e.g. Walmart, Target) or grocery store. Gas stations, banks, and other businesses also may have their own free-standing buildings in the parking lot of the strip center.

The other variety of strip mall in the U.S. is usually anchored on one end by a big box retailer, such as Wal-Mart, Kohl's or Target, and/or by a large supermarket on the other. They are usually referred to as power centers in the real estate development industry because they attract and cater to residents of an expanded population area. The categories of retailers may vary widely, from electronics stores to bookstores to home improvement stores. There are typically only a few of this type of strip malls in a city, compared to the smaller types. Retailers vary from center to center, ranging from three or four large retailers to a dozen or more.

Some strip malls are hybrids of these types.

Strip malls are ubiquitous throughout the United States and outnumber traditional large shopping malls by a huge margin. As the New York Times pointed out in 2013, the United States has 685 class-A, super-regional malls and 65,840 strip malls.[1]

Architectural styles

Strip malls vary widely in architecture. Older strip malls tend to have plain architecture with the stores arranged in a straight row, though L-shaped configurations are not uncommon. Newer strip malls are often built with elaborate architecture to blend in with the neighborhood and to attract the upscale consumer. In some cases, strip malls are broken up into smaller buildings to establish a more appropriate sense of scale and to create architectural articulation. A current trend with the purpose of screening the parking lot from the street and nearby residences is locating the buildings with little to no setback from the street. Some stores may allow for entrances from both the street sidewalk and the parking lot.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Kramer, Andrew E. (January 1, 2013). "With a Mall Boom in Russia, Investors Go Shopping".  

External links

  • Localcenters – Commercial Strip Mall Reference Site
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.