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Tom Brindle (politician)

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Title: Tom Brindle (politician)  
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Subject: Frederick Cooke (socialist), Gisborne (New Zealand electorate), New Zealand Labour Party, Moira Coatsworth, Tom Paul
Collection: 1878 Births, 1950 Deaths, English Emigrants to New Zealand, Members of the New Zealand Legislative Council, New Zealand Labour Party Mlcs, People from Lancashire, Unsuccessful Candidates in the New Zealand General Election, 1919, Unsuccessful Candidates in the New Zealand General Election, 1922, Unsuccessful Candidates in the New Zealand General Election, 1925, Unsuccessful Candidates in the New Zealand General Election, 1928, Unsuccessful Candidates in the New Zealand General Election, 1931, Wellington City Councillors
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Tom Brindle (politician)

Tom Brindle
6th President of the Labour Party
In office
1922–1926
Vice President John Archer (1922-5)
Jim Thorn (1926-6)
Leader Harry Holland
Preceded by Frederick Cooke
Succeeded by Bob Semple
Personal details
Born 1878
Lancashire or Manchester
Died 19 November 1950
Nationality New Zealand
Political party Labour Party

Thomas "Tom" Brindle (1878 – 19 November 1950) was a British-born early activist for the New Zealand Labour Party who was jailed during WWI for speaking out against conscription. He was a member of Wellington City Council and stood for election to the House of Representatives five times. He was a member of the Legislative Council from 1936 until March 1950.

Contents

  • Early life in England 1
  • Political career 2
  • Death 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5

Early life in England

Brindle was born in 1878; sources vary whether his place of birth was Lancashire[1] or Manchester.[2] In England, he was active in the Independent Labour Party.[3]

Political career

Brindle emigrated to New Zealand in 1910[3] or 1912,[2] and he became active with the Social Democratic Party.[2] He was jailed in 1916 during WWI for speaking out against conscription.[4][5] He stood for secretaryship of the New Zealand Labour Party in 1919, but withdrew and Michael Joseph Savage became the first full-time paid secretary.[6] Brindle stood again in 1920, but lost the ballot. From 1922 to 1926, he was the 6th President of the Labour Party.[2]

Brindle unsuccessfully stood five times for the House of Representatives.[3] In 1919 and 1922, he was one of three candidates in the Gisborne electorate, and he came last on both occasions.[7][8] In 1925, he was one of three candidates in the Nelson electorate, and he again came last.[9] In 1928 and 1931, he was one of three candidates in the Wellington Suburbs electorate, and he came second on both occasions.[10][11][12]

Brindle was first elected to Wellington City Council in 1933[1] and remained on the city council until 1941.[2] He was appointed to the Legislative Council by the First Labour Government under Michael Joseph Savage and was one of 14 new appointments. At the time of his appointment, he lived in Wellington.[13]

In 1935, he was awarded the

Party political offices
Preceded by
Frederick Cooke
President of the Labour Party
1922–1926
Succeeded by
Bob Semple

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ a b c d e Gustafson 1980, p. 155.
  3. ^ a b c
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ Gustafson 1980, p. 139.
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^

Notes

Brindle died on 19 November 1950.[16]

Death

Brindle was a member of the New Zealand Legislative Council from 9 March 1936 to 8 March 1943; and 9 March 1943 to 8 March 1950.[15]

[14]

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