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Treble (sound)

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Title: Treble (sound)  
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Subject: Equalization (audio), Wah-wah (music), Frequency extender, Gravikord, Clef
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Treble (sound)

Treble refers to tones whose frequency or range is at the higher end of human hearing. In music this corresponds to "high notes". The treble clef is often used to notate such notes.[1] Examples of treble sounds are guitar tones, female voice (such as soprano ), young male voice, etc. The frequencies generally adjusted by treble controls on audio equipment are above 2 kHz, although vocal and instrumental core tones classed as treble lines are generally lower. Treble sound is the counterpart to bass sound.

The term "treble" derives from the Latin triplum, used in 13th century motets to indicate the third and highest range.

The treble control is used in sound reproduction to change the volume of treble notes relative to those of the middle and bass frequency ranges.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Pitch Notation". www.studybass.com. Retrieved 2011-11-10. 


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