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UEFA Women's Championship

UEFA Women's Championship
Founded 1984
Region Europe (UEFA)
Number of teams 52 (Qualifiers)
12 (Finals)
Current champions  Germany (8th title)
Most successful team(s)  Germany (8 titles)
Website //womenseuro.com.uefawww
UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

The predecessor tournament to the UEFA Women's Championship began in the early 1980s, under the name UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. With increasing popularity of women's football, the competition was given European Championship status by UEFA around 1990. Only the 1991 and 1995 editions have been used as European qualifiers for a World Cup; starting in 1999, the group system used in men's qualifiers was also used for women's national teams.

Eight UEFA Women's Championships have taken place, preceded by 3 editions of the earlier European Competition for Representative Women's Teams. The most recent holding of the competition was the 2013 Women's Euro hosted by Sweden in July 2013.

Contents

  • Expansion 1
  • Results 2
    • European Competition for Women's Football 2.1
    • UEFA European Women's Championship 2.2
    • Teams reaching the top four 2.3
  • Team summary 3
    • Participation details 3.1
    • Results of host nations 3.2
    • Results of defending champions 3.3
    • General Statistics 3.4
  • Tournament statistics 4
    • Highest attendances 4.1
    • Top scorers of all time 4.2
    • Top scorers by tournament 4.3
    • Golden Player by tournament 4.4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Expansion

The tournament was initially played as a four team event. The 1997 edition was the first that was played with eight teams. The third expansion happened in 2009 when 12 teams participated. From 2017 onwards 16 teams will compete for the championship.[1]

Results

European Competition for Women's Football

Year Host Final Third Place Match Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th Place
1984
Details
Final held over two legs
Sweden
1–0
0–1
4–3 (ps)

England
 Denmark and  Italy 4
1987
Details
Norway
Norway
2–1
Sweden

Italy
2–1
England
4
1989
Details
West Germany
West Germany
4–1
Norway

Sweden
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4

UEFA European Women's Championship

Year Host Final Third place match Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1991
Details
Denmark
Germany
3–1
(a.e.t.)

Norway

Denmark
2–1
(a.e.t.)

Italy
4
1993
Details
Italy
Norway
1–0
Italy

Denmark
3–1
Germany
4
Year Host Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up
1995
Details
Germany
Germany
3–2
Sweden
 England and  Norway 4
1997
Details
Norway &
Sweden

Germany
2–0
Italy
 Spain and  Sweden 8
2001
Details
Germany
Germany
1–0
(gg)

Sweden
 Denmark and  Norway 8
2005
Details
England
Germany
3–1
Norway
 Finland and  Sweden 8
2009
Details
Finland
Germany
6–2
England
 Norway and  Netherlands 12
2013
Details
Sweden
Germany
1–0
Norway
 Denmark and  Sweden 12
2017
Details
 Netherlands 16

Teams reaching the top four

Team Titles Runners-up Third-place Semi-finalists Fourth-place Total
 Germany 8 (1989, 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013) 1 (1993) 9
 Norway 2 (1987, 1993) 4 (1989, 1991, 2005, 2013) 3 (1995, 2001, 2009) 9
 Sweden 1 (1984) 3 (1987, 1995, 2001) 1 (1989) 3 (1997, 2005, 2013) 8
 Italy 2 (1993, 1997) 1 (1987) 1 (1984) 2 (1989, 1991) 6
 England 2 (1984, 2009) 1 (1995) 1 (1987) 4
 Denmark 2 (1991, 1993) 3 (1984, 2001, 2013) 5
 Spain 1 (1997) 1
 Finland 1 (2005) 1
 Netherlands 1 (2009) 1

Team summary

Participation details

Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland.
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Römer"
  • Participation by year of debut
    • 1984: Denmark, England, Italy, Sweden
    • 1987: Norway
    • 1989: Germany
    • 1997: France, Russia, Spain
    • 2005: Finland
    • 2009: Iceland, Netherlands, Ukraine
Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place (not determined after 1993)
  • 4th – Fourth place (not determined after 1993)
  • SF – Semifinals (since 1995)
  • QF – Quarterfinals (since 2009)
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  •  — Did not qualify
  •  ×  — Did not enter
  •    — Hosts

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1984
(4)
1987

(4)
1989

(4)
1991

(4)
1993

(4)
1995

(4)
1997


(8)
2001

(8)
2005

(8)
2009

(12)
2013

(12)
2017

(16)
Years
 Denmark 3rd 3rd 3rd GS SF GS GS SF 8
 England 2nd 4th SF GS GS 2nd GS 7
 Finland SF QF GS 3
 France GS GS GS QF QF 5
 Germany 1st 1st 4th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 9
 Iceland × × × GS QF 2
 Italy 4th 3rd 4th 4th 2nd 2nd GS GS QF QF 10
 Netherlands SF GS 2
 Norway 1st 2nd 2nd 1st SF GS SF 2nd SF 2nd 10
 Russia × × × × GS GS GS GS 4
 Spain × SF QF 2
 Sweden 1st 2nd 3rd 2nd SF 2nd SF QF SF 9
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union × GS 1

General Statistics

Team Part Pld W D L GF GA Dif Pts
 Germany 9 39 32 5 2 104 23 +81 101
 Sweden 9 34 19 4 11 64 41 +23 61
 Norway 10 33 15 7 11 47 44 +3 52
 Italy 10 28 8 5 15 33 48 -12 29
 France 5 17 7 4 6 26 26 0 25
 Denmark 8 24 6 7 11 26 35 -9 25
 England 7 23 7 3 13 29 47 -18 24
 Finland 3 11 3 3 5 11 19 -8 12
 Russia 4 12 3 0 9 8 26 -18 9
 Netherlands 2 8 2 2 4 6 7 -1 6
 Spain 2 8 2 2 4 8 11 -3 6
 Iceland 2 7 1 1 5 5 13 -8 4
 Ukraine 1 3 1 0 2 2 4 -2 3

Tournament statistics

Highest attendances

Top scorers of all time

Rank Name Euro Total


1984

1987

1989

1991

1993

1995


1997

2001

2005

2009

2013
1 Inka Grings 0 4 6 10
Birgit Prinz 2 2 1 3 2 10
3 Carolina Morace 2 1 0 0 1 4 8
Heidi Mohr 1 4 1 2 8
4 Hanna Ljungberg 1 2 3 6
Lotta Schelin 0 1 5 6
7 Melania Gabbiadini 2 1 2 5
Solveig Gulbrandsen 0 3 0 2 5
Maren Meinert 1 1 1 2 5
Patrizia Panico 1 2 0 2 0 5
Lena Videkull 0 1 1 3 5
Bettina Wiegmann 0 0 2 1 2 5

Top scorers by tournament

Year Player Maximum
matches
Goals
1984 Pia Sundhage 4 3
1987 Trude Strendal 2 3
1989 Sissel Grude
Ursula Lohn
2 2
1991 Heidi Mohr 2 4
1993 Susan Mackensie 2 2
1995 Lena Videkull 3 3
1997 Carolina Morace
Marianne Pettersen
Angélique Rouhas
5 4
2001 Claudia Müller
Sandra Smisek
5 3
2005 Inka Grings 5 4
2009 Inka Grings 6 6
2013 Lotta Schelin 6 5

Golden Player by tournament

Year Player
1984 Pia Sundhage
1987 Heidi Støre
1989 Doris Fitschen
1991 Silvia Neid
1993 Hege Riise
1995 Birgit Prinz
1997 Carolina Morace
2001 Hanna Ljungberg
2005 Anne Mäkinen
2009 Inka Grings
2013 Nadine Angerer

See also

References

  1. ^ "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 

External links

  • UEFA Women's Championship
  • BBC Sport – "How Women's Euros have evolved"
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