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United States Army Corrections Command

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Title: United States Army Corrections Command  
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United States Army Corrections Command

Shoulder sleeve insignia approved 28 September 2007[1]
Distinctive unit insignia approved 28 September 2007[2]

The United States Army Corrections Command (ACC) exercises command and control and operational oversight for policy, programming, resourcing, and support of Army Corrections System (ACS) facilities and TDA elements worldwide.

On order, ACC coordinates the execution of condemned military prisoners.

History

Prior to its establishment in 2007, prisons operated under the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, U.S. Army Forces Command, U.S. Army Europe, and U.S. Forces Korea.[3]

On 2 October 2007, the US Army Corrections Command (ACC) was established as a Field Operating Agency (FOA) under the Operational Control of the United States Army Provost Marshal General, Department of the Army. It is headquartered in Arlington, Virginia.[4]

The Army Corrections Command exercises command and control, operational oversight, and support of the ACS. ACS facilities are located at the following installations: Fort Knox, Fort Leavenworth, Fort Lewis, Fort Sill, Coleman Barracks USAREUR, and Camp Humphreys USFK.

The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (ASA) (M&RA) exercises Army Secretary oversight for Army Corrections, parole and clemency functions.

ACC will standardize, eliminate command layers and streamline corrections operations across the Army.

Army Corrections Command Facilities

As of 2007, it managed 1,700 civilian and military personnel, 2,300 military prisoners in military and Federal Bureau of Prisons facilities or on mandatory supervised release or parole.[5]

Prisoner operations

Prisoner uniforms for regular post-trial male inmates include brown shirts and trousers. Male trustee prisoners in the minimum and medium custodies wear special blue shirt and trouser uniforms. Maximum custody male prisoners wear orange jumpsuits. Pre-trial male prisoners wear tan-colored shirts and trousers. Female pre-trial and post-trial prisoners wear light blue shirt and trouser uniforms. Headgear consists of orange watch caps and orange ball caps.[6] During "cold weather" periods, prisoners wear brown coats.[7] The USDB will determine the uniforms of death penalty prisoners. The ACC said that this is the case because of "the uniqueness of this category of prisoner."[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Alpha/ArmyCorrectionsCommand.htm
  2. ^ http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Alpha/ArmyCorrectionsCommand.htm
  3. ^ Vanguards of Justice: The Activation of the Army Corrections Command
  4. ^ Vanguards of Justice: The Activation of the Army Corrections Command
  5. ^ The Army Corrections Command: bringing it all together
  6. ^ "Policy Letter #15." (Archive) United States Army Corrections Command. 1. Retrieved on February 18, 2012.
  7. ^ "Policy Letter #15." (Archive) United States Army Corrections Command. 2. Retrieved on February 18, 2012.
  8. ^ "Policy Letter #15." (Archive) United States Army Corrections Command. 3. Retrieved on February 18, 2012.
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