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United States House Committee on Science, Space and Technology

 

United States House Committee on Science, Space and Technology

The Committee on Science, Space and Technology is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. It has jurisdiction over non-defense federal scientific research and development. Specifically, the committee has partial or complete jurisdiction over the following federal agencies: NASA, the Department of Energy, EPA, ATSDR, NSF, FAA, NOAA, National Institute of Standards and Technology, FEMA, the U.S. Fire Administration, and United States Geological Survey.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Members 2
    • 113th Congress 2.1
    • 112th Congress 2.2
    • 111th Congress 2.3
  • Subcommittees 3
  • Committee chairmen, 1959-present 4
  • References 5
  • See also 6
  • External links 7

History

In the wake of the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s, Congress created the Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration in 1958, chaired by majority leader John William McCormack. This select committee drafted the National Aeronautics and Space Act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A staff report of the committee, the Space Handbook: Astronautics and its Applications, provided non-technical information about spaceflight to U.S. policy makers.[1]

The committee also chartered the permanent House Committee on Science and Astronautics, which officially began on January 3, 1959, and was the first new standing committee established in the House since 1946. The name was changed in 1974 to the House Committee on Science and Technology. The name was changed again in 1987 to the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. After the Republican Party gained a majority in Congress in 1994, the name of the committee was changed to the House Committee on Science. With the return of control to the Democrats in 2007, the committee's name was changed back to the House Committee on Science and Technology.

In the 112th Congress, Committee Chairman Ralph Hall added “Space” back into the Committee’s name: “The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology” – a nod to the Committee’s history, broad jurisdiction, and the importance of space exploration in maintaining American innovation and competitiveness.[2]

Members

113th Congress

Majority Minority

Sources: H.Res. 6 (Chairs), H.Res. 7 (D), H.Res. 17 (R) and H.Res. 22 (D).

112th Congress

Majority Minority

Source:

  • Resolutions electing Republican members (H.Res. 6, H.Res. 37)
  • Resolutions electing Democratic members (H.Res. 7, H.Res. 39)

111th Congress

Majority Minority

Sources:

  • H.Res. 38, electing minority members to standing committees
  • H.Res. 74, electing majority members to standing committees
  • H.Res. 921, electing majority members to standing committees

Subcommittees

There are five subcommittees in the 113th Congress.

Subcommittee Chair Ranking Member
Energy Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
Environment Chris Stewart (R-UT) Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR)
Oversight Paul Broun (R-GA) Dan Maffei (D-NY)
Research and Technology Larry Bucshon (R-IN) Dan Lipinski (D-IL)
Space Steven Palazzo (R-MS) Donna Edwards (D-MD)

Committee chairmen, 1959-present

Chairmen since 1959.[4]

References

  1. ^ "Space Handbook: Astronautics and its Applications". NASA. 
  2. ^ "A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY" (PDF). United States Government. November 7, 2007. 
  3. ^ H.Res. 822, November 29, 2012
  4. ^ Ibid.

See also

External links

  • Official web site
  • Republican Science Committee website
  • Democratic Science Committee website
  • A History of the Committee on Science and Technology: 85th-110th Congresses 1958-2008
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