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United States House of Representatives elections in Utah, 2010

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United States House of Representatives elections in Utah, 2010

Elections were held on November 2, 2010 to determine Utah's three members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th United States Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on June 22, 2010.[1]

All three of Utah's U.S. Representatives (Republicans Rob Bishop of the 1st district and Jason Chaffetz of the 3rd district, and Democrat Jim Matheson of the 2nd district) were re-elected.[2] Of the three elections, only the 2nd district was rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report.[3]

A total of 640,495 votes were cast, of which 390,969 (61.04 percent) were for Republican candidates, 218,236 (34.07 percent) were for Democratic candidates, 18,317 (2.86 percent) were for Constitution Party candidates, 7,252 (1.13 percent) were for Libertarian Party candidates and 5,721 (0.89 percent) were for independent candidates.[4]

District 1

Rob Bishop, who was re-elected in the 1st district

The 1st district included Bountiful, Clearfield, Layton, Logan, Ogden, Roy, Tooele and part of Salt Lake City.[5] The district's population was 81 percent white and 13 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 90 percent were high school graduates and 28 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $55,788.[6] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 64 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 33 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[5]

Republican LDS seminary teacher at Sky View High School. Constitution Party nominee Kirk Pearson and Libertarian Party nominee Jared Paul Stratton also ran.[7] Bishop and Bowen were unopposed in their respective party primaries.[8]

Bishop raised $278,327 and spent $302,771. Bowen raised $11,550 and spent $11,309.[9] A poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research Inc. between October 25 and 27, 2010, 65 percent of respondents supported Bishop while 13 percent favored Bowen.[10] In a poll of 375 active voters, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates between October 25 and 28, 2010, Bishop led with 66 percent to Bowen's 21 percent, while 4 percent supported Pearson, Stratton had the support of 1 percent, 1 percent favored other candidates and 7 percent were undecided.[11]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Bishop a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 73 percent of the vote to Bowen's 24 percent.[12] On election day Bishop was re-elected with 69 percent of the vote to Bowen's 24 percent.[13] Bishop was again re-elected in 2012[14] and 2014.[15]

General election results

Utah's 1st district general election, November 2, 2010[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Bishop (incumbent) 135,247 69.19%
Democratic Morgan Bowen 46,765 23.93%
Constitution Kirk Pearson 9,143 4.68%
Libertarian Jared Paul Stratton 4,307 2.20%
Totals 195,462 100.00%

External links

  • Rob Bishop campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Morgan Bowen campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Kirk Pearson campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 5, 2010)

District 2

Jim Matheson, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district
Morgan Philpot, who also ran in the 2nd district

The 2nd district included Lehi, Murray and Salt Lake City.[16] The district's population was 86 percent white and 8 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 92 percent were high school graduates and 33 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $55,863.[17] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 58 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 40 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[16] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+15.[3]

Democrat Utah House of Representatives.[19] Independent candidates Dave Glissmeyer, the founder of ProTel NetWorks;[20] and Wayne L. Hill;[21] and Constitution Party nominee Randall Hinton, a web developer,[22] also ran. Claudia Wright, a teacher, also sought the Democratic nomination.[23] Scott McCoy, a member of the Utah State Senate, suggested in November 2009 that Matheson should be challenged in the Democratic primary in response to his vote against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, but said he would not run.[24] Philpot was unopposed in the Republican primary.[8]

Matheson raised $1,803,801 and spent $2,465,527. Philpot raised $386,467 and spent the same amount. Glissmeyer raised $8,987 and spent $11,150.[25]

In a poll of 200 registered voters, conducted by Western Wats between September 30 and October 3, 2010, Matheson led with 46 percent to Philpot's 30 percent.[26] A poll of 226 likely voters, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates, the results of which were published in October 2010, found Matheson leading with 57 percent to Philpot's 31 percent, while Glissmeyer and Hinton had the support of 1 percent apiece, less than 1 percent backed Hill, and 9 percent were undecided.[27] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research Inc. between October 25 and 27, 2010, 48 percent of respondents supported Matheson while 35 percent favored Philpot and 11 percent were undecided.[10] A poll of 456 active voters, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates between October 25 and 28, 2010, found Matheson leading with 51 percent to Philpot's 39 percent, while 1 percent supported Hinton, 1 percent backed other candidates, and 7 percent were undecided.[11]

In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Likely Democratic".[3] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Matheson an 87 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 53 percent of the vote to Philpot's 44 percent.[26] On election day Matheson was re-elected with 50 percent of the vote to Philpot's 46 percent.[13] Matheson was again re-elected in 2012[28] and retired rather than seeking re-election in 2014.[29] He was succeeded by Republican Mia Love.[30]

Democratic primary results

Utah's 2nd district Democratic primary, June 22, 2010[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Matheson (incumbent) 23,067 67.26%
Democratic Claudia Wright 11,227 32.74%
Totals 34,294 100.00%

General election results

Utah's 2nd district general election, November 2, 2010[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Matheson (incumbent) 127,151 50.49%
Republican Morgan Philpot 116,001 46.06%
Constitution Randall Hinton 4,578 1.82%
Independent David Glissmeyer 2,391 0.95%
Independent Wayne L. Hill 1,726 0.69%
Totals 251,847 100.00%

External links

  • Dave Glissmeyer campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Randall Hinton campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived August 20, 2010)
  • Jim Matheson campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 29, 2010)
  • Morgan Philpot campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 1, 2010)
  • Claudia Wright campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived February 8, 2011)

District 3

Jason Chaffetz, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Orem, Provo, South Jordan, Taylorsville, West Jordan and West Valley City.[32] The district's population was 80 percent white and 14 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 89 percent were high school graduates and 26 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $57,852.[33] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 67 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 29 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[32]

Republican Jason Chaffetz, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Chaffetz was elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[32] Chaffetz announced in January 2010 that he would seek re-election rather than running for the U.S. Senate.[34] In 2010 Chaffetz's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Karen Hyer, an adjunct professor at Brigham Young University. Independent candidate Joe Puente, a filmmaker and actor;[35] Libertarian Party nominee Jake Shannon, a hypnotherapist and entrepreneur;[36] and Constitution Party nominee Douglas Sligting[37] also ran.

Chaffetz raised $647,194 and spent $540,646. Hyer raised $23,818 and spent the same amount. Sligtig raised $3,536 and spent $2,225.[38]

In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research Inc. between October 25 and 27, 2010, Chaffetz led with 56 percent to Hyer's 11 percent.[10] A poll of 375 active voters, conducted by Dan Jones & Associates between October 25 and 28, 2010, found Chaffetz leading with 70 percent to Hyer's 19 percent, while Sligting had the support of 2 percent, Puente had the support of 1 percent, 2 percent chose other candidates and 6 percent were undecided.[11] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Chaffetz a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 73 percent of the vote to Hyer's 23 percent.[39] On election day Chaffetz was re-elected with 72 percent of the vote to Hyer's 23 percent.[13] Chaffetz was again re-elected in 2012[40] and 2014.[41]

General election results

Utah's 3rd district general election, November 2, 2010[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jason Chaffetz (incumbent) 139,721 72.32%
Democratic Karen Hyer 44,320 22.94%
Constitution Douglas Sligting 4,596 2.38%
Libertarian Jake Shannon 2,945 1.52%
Independent Joe Puente 1,604 0.83%
Totals 193,186 100.00%

External links

  • Jason Chaffetz campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Karen Hyer campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 4, 2010)
  • Douglas Sligting campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived April 15, 2010)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Primary Results".  
  2. ^ "Utah".  
  3. ^ a b c "2010 competitive House race chart".  
  4. ^  
  5. ^ a b c "Utah – 1st District".  
  6. ^ "Utah 1st District Profile".  
  7. ^ O'Donoghue, Amy Joi (October 22, 2010). "2 teachers – Rep. Rob Bishop and Morgan Bowen – face off in 1st Congressional District".  
  8. ^ a b Debevec, Nicole (June 20, 2010). "Politics 2010: Sen. Bennett's GOP ballot successor to be picked".  
  9. ^ "Utah District 01 Race".  
  10. ^ a b c Gehrke, Robert (October 29, 2010). "Tribune poll good news for incumbents".  
  11. ^ a b c "Deseret News/KLS-TV Poll".  
  12. ^ "Utah 1st District".  
  13. ^ a b c d e f "2010 General Election".  
  14. ^ Davidson, Lee (November 7, 2012). "Chaffetz, Bishop coast to victories".  
  15. ^ Hamburger, Jay (November 7, 2014). "Donna McAleer wins Summit County, loses elsewhere".  
  16. ^ a b c "Utah – 2nd district".  
  17. ^ "Utah 2nd District Profile".  
  18. ^ Gehrke, Robert; Loomis, Brandon (July 30, 2009). "Matheson won't run for governor or Senate in 2010".  
  19. ^ Piatt, Richard (October 25, 2010). "Matheson ad attacks Philpot for voting record, unpaid taxes".  
  20. ^ McKitrick, Cathy (November 25, 2009). "Political independent to take on Matheson".  
  21. ^ "Question for the candidates: Wayne L. Hill (U)".  
  22. ^ Smith, Josh (March 9, 2010). "Constitutional Party Randall Hinton candidate enters Utah's 2nd District race".  
  23. ^ Roche, Lisa Riley; Raymond, Arthur (May 9, 2010). "Jim Matheson forced into primary election with Claudia Wright for Utah Democrat nomination".  
  24. ^ McKitrick, Cathy (November 9, 2009). "Matheson's vote on health care reform saddens Dems".  
  25. ^ "Utah District 02 Race".  
  26. ^ a b "Utah 2nd District".  
  27. ^ Piatt, Richard (October 18, 2010). "Matheson in the lead as election approaches".  
  28. ^ Gehrke, Robert (November 6, 2012). "Matheson ekes out narrow win over Mia Love".  
  29. ^ Sullivan, Sean (December 17, 2013). "Rep. Jim Matheson (D-Utah) will retire".  
  30. ^ Landers, Peter (November 5, 2014). "Mia Love Wins, Will Be First Black Republican Woman in Congress".  
  31. ^ "2010 Primary Election".  
  32. ^ a b c "Utah – 3rd District".  
  33. ^ "Utah 3rd District Profile".  
  34. ^ O'Brien, Michael (January 7, 2010). "Chaffetz passes on challenging Bennett".  
  35. ^ Haddock, Marc (March 18, 2010). "Candidates Karen E. Hyer, Joe Puente file to oppose Jason Chaffetz for 3rd Congressional District".  
  36. ^ Loftin, Josh (September 29, 2010). "Congressional 3rd District Candidate Jake Shannon".  
  37. ^ Fidel, Steve (October 25, 2010). "3rd Congressional District campaign interesting but not close".  
  38. ^ "Utah District 03 Race".  
  39. ^ "Utah 3rd District".  
  40. ^ "Utah election results 2012: Hatch wins seventh term in Senate; Rep. Chaffetz reelected to House; Mia Love appears to fall short in House race".  
  41. ^ "Editorial: Chaffetz should watch and be watched".  
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