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United States Senate election in Oklahoma, 2004

United States Senate election in Oklahoma, 2004

November 2, 2004

 
Nominee Tom Coburn Brad Carson
Party Republican Democratic Independent
Popular vote 763,433 596,750 86,663
Percentage 52.77% 41.24% 5.99%

County results

U.S. Senator before election

Don Nickles
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Tom Coburn
Republican

The 2004 United States Senate election in Oklahoma took place on November 2, 2004. The election was concurrent with elections to the United States House of Representatives and the presidential election. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Don Nickles decided to retire instead of seeking a fifth term. Republican nominee Tom Coburn won the open seat.

Contents

  • Democratic primary 1
    • Candidates 1.1
    • Results 1.2
  • Republican primary 2
    • Candidates 2.1
    • Campaign 2.2
    • Results 2.3
  • General election 3
    • Candidates 3.1
    • Campaign 3.2
    • Results 3.3
  • References 4

Democratic primary

Candidates

Results

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brad Carson 280,026 79.37%
Democratic Carroll Fisher 28,385 8.05%
Democratic Jim Rogers 20,179 5.72%
Democratic Monte E. Johnson 17,274 4.90%
Democratic W. B. G. Woodson 6,932 1.96%
Totals 352,796 100.00%

Republican primary

Candidates

Campaign

Humphreys, the former Mayor of John McCain.

Ultimately, Coburn triumphed over Humphreys, Anthony, and Hunt in the primary, winning every county in Oklahoma except for tiny Harmon County.

Results

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Coburn 145,974 61.23%
Republican Kirk Humphreys 59,877 25.12%
Republican Bob Anthony 29,596 12.41%
Republican Jay Richard Hunt 2,944 1.23%
Totals 238,391 100.00%

General election

Candidates

Campaign

Carson and Coburn engaged each other head-on in one of the year's most brutal Vice-President Dick Cheney campaigned for Coburn and appeared in several television advertisements for him.[5] Carson countered by emphasizing his Stilwell roots[6] and his moderation, specifically, bringing attention to the fact that he fought for greater governmental oversight of nursing home care for the elderly.[7] Carson responded to the attacks against him by countering that his opponent had committed Medicaid fraud years prior, in an event that reportedly left a woman sterilized without her consent.[8] Ultimately, however, Carson was not able to overcome Oklahoma's conservative nature and Senator Kerry's abysmal performance in Oklahoma, and he was defeated by Coburn by 11.5%. As of 2012, the result remains the closest the Democrats have come to winning a Senate election in Oklahoma since Republican Don Nickles was first elected to the Senate by 8.7% in 1980.

Results

United States Senate election in Oklahoma, 2004[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Tom Coburn 763,433 52.77% -13.62%
Democratic Brad Carson 596,750 41.24% +9.97%
Independent Sheila Bilyeu 86,663 5.99%
Majority 166,683 11.52% -23.58%
Turnout 1,446,846
Republican hold Swing

References

  1. ^ a b http://www.ok.gov/elections/The_Archives/Election_Results/2004_Election_Results/Primary_Election_2004.html
  2. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/19/politics/campaign/19repubs.html?pagewanted=print&position=&_r=0
  3. ^ http://www.ldjackson.net/news-politics/tom-coburn-the-real-maverick-in-the-senate/
  4. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_zHqYD2KAU
  5. ^ http://www3.nationaljournal.com/members/adspotlight/2004/10/1007oksen1.htm
  6. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWeBg0-nST4
  7. ^ http://newsok.com/carsons-first-stand-should-feds-examine-nursing-homes/article/2738499
  8. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A21673-2004Sep14.html
  9. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2004election.pdf
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