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United States gubernatorial elections, 1966

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United States gubernatorial elections, 1966

United States gubernatorial elections, 1966

Elections were held on November 8, 1966, unless otherwise noted.

Alabama

Until 1968, Alabama governors were not allowed two successive terms. To circumvent, Wallace used his wife Lurleen as his stand-in. She died in 1968.[1][2]

Alaska

Egan was defeated in 1966, but would get re-elected in 1970 (see United States gubernatorial elections, 1970).

Arizona

In Arizona, they operated on governors serving two-year terms until 1970, when Jack Richard Williams was the first governor to be elected to a four-year term.[3][4] Previously, William had been elected governor for 2 2-year terms in 1966[5] and in 1968.[6] Arizona made the switch official from a two-year term to a four-year term in 1968 with an amendment.[7]

Arizona adopted not only a 4-year term for governors starting in the general election of 1970, but they adopted a two consecutive term limit in 1992.[8]

Arkansas

Arkansas had two-year terms for governors until 1984, when they switched to four-year terms for governors with Amendment 63.[9]

Rockefeller would become the first Republican governor since Reconstruction.[10]

California

Brown was defeated by the future President Ronald Reagan.

Florida

William Haydon Burns was elected in 1964 for a short term because Florida shifted their governors' races from presidential years to mid-term years. Starting in 1966, Florida did their 4-year gubernatorial races in midterm years.[11]

Kirk was the first Republican governor in the 20th century.[12]

In 1968, Florida adopted a new state constitution, and the governor got the option to serve two four-year terms in a row.[13][14]

Georgia

Maddox was elected by the State Legislature, and Callaway was the first Republican nominee for Governor since 1876.[15]

Oklahoma

During Henry Bellmon's first term (1963-1967), the Oklahoma Constitution was changed to allow governor to serve consecutive terms, however, the rule change did not apply to Bellmon. Thus, Bellmon was not eligible to serve a second term. Bellmon later served another term from 1987-1991.[16]


United States 1966 Governors' Races Chart

State Incumbent Party Status Opposing Candidates
Alabama George Wallace Democratic Term-limited, Democratic victory Lurleen Wallace (Democratic) 63.38%
James D. Martin (Republican) 31.00%
Carl Robinson (Independent) 5.62%
[17]
Alaska William A. Egan Democratic Defeated, 48.37% Wally Hickel (Republican) 50.00%
John F. Grasse (No Party) 1.64%
[18]
Arizona Samuel Pearson Goddard, Jr. Democratic Defeated, 46.23% Jack Richard Williams (Republican) 53.77%
[19]
Arkansas Orval Faubus Democratic Retired, Republican victory Winthrop Rockefeller (Republican) 54.36%
James D. Johnson (Democratic) 45.64%
[20]
California Pat Brown Democratic Defeated, 42.27% Ronald Reagan (Republican) 57.55%
Others 0.18%
[21]
Colorado John Arthur Love Republican Re-elected, 54.05% Robert L. Knous (Democratic) 43.50%
Levi Martinez (New Hispano) 2.45%
[22]
Connecticut John N. Dempsey Democratic Re-elected, 55.68% E. Clayton Gengras (Republican) 44.28%
Others 0.04%
[23]
Florida W. Haydon Burns Democratic Defeated in Democratic runoff, Republican victory[24] Claude R. Kirk, Jr. (Republican) 55.13%
Robert King High (Democratic) 44.86%
Others 0.02%
[25]
Georgia Carl Sanders Democratic Term-limited, Democratic victory Lester Maddox (Democratic) 47.06%
Howard Hollis Callaway (Republican) 47.38%
Ellis Arnall (Independent) 5.43%
Others 0.14%
[26]
Hawaii John A. Burns Democratic Re-elected, 51.06% Randolph Crossley (Republican) 48.94%
[27]
Idaho Robert E. Smylie Republican Defeated in Republican primary, Republican victory[28] Don Samuelson (Republican) 41.41%
Cecil D. Andrus (Democratic) 37.11%
Perry Swisher (Independent) 12.24%
Philip Jungert (Independent) 9.16%
Don Walker (Independent) 0.08%
[29]
Iowa Harold Hughes Democratic Re-elected, 55.34% William G. Murray (Republican) 44.17%
David B. Quiner (American Constitution) 0.41%
Charles Sloca (Iowa) 0.08%
[30]
Kansas William H. Avery Republican Defeated, 43.92% Robert Docking (Democratic) 54.84%
Rolland Ernest Fisher (Prohibition) 0.68%
Carson Crawford (Conservative) 0.56%
[31]
Maine John H. Reed Republican Defeated, 46.88% Kenneth M. Curtis (Democratic) 53.12%
[32]
Maryland J. Millard Tawes Democratic Term-limited, Republican victory Spiro Agnew (Republican) 49.50%
George Perry Mahoney (Democratic) 40.61%
Hyman A. Pressman (Independent) n9.88%
[33]
Massachusetts John A. Volpe Republican Re-elected, 62.58% Edward J. McCormack, Jr. (Democratic) 36.88%
Henning A. Blomen (Socialist Labor) 0.32%
John C. Hedges (Prohibition) 0.22%
[34]
Michigan George W. Romney Republican Re-elected, 60.54% Zolton A. Ferency (Democratic) 39.13%
James Horvath (Socialist Labor) 0.33%
[35]
Minnesota Karl Rolvaag Democratic Defeated, 46.94% Harold LeVander (Republican) 52.55%
Kenneth Sachs (Industrial Government) 0.50%
[36]
Nebraska Frank B. Morrison Democratic Retired, Republican victory Norbert T. Tiemann (Republican) 61.52%
Philip C. Sorensen (Democratic) 38.44%
Others 0.03%
[37]
Nevada Grant Sawyer Democratic Defeated, 47.84% Paul Laxalt (Republican) 52.16%[38]
New Hampshire John W. King Democratic Re-elected, 53.88% Hugh Gregg (Republican) 45.91%
Others 0.21%
[39]
New Mexico Jack M. Campbell Democratic Term-limited, Republican victory David Cargo (Republican) 51.73%
Thomas E. Lusk (Democratic) 48.26%
Others 0.01%
[40]
New York Nelson A. Rockefeller Republican Re-elected, 44.61% Frank D. O'Connor (Democratic) 38.11%
Paul Adams (Conservative) 8.46%
Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. (Liberal) 8.41%
Milton Herder (Socialist Labor) 0.21%
Judith White (Socialist Workers) 0.21%
[41]
Ohio Jim Rhodes Republican Re-elected, 62.18% Frazier Reams, Jr. (Democratic) 37.82%
[42]
Oklahoma Henry Bellmon Republican Term-limited, Republican victory Dewey F. Bartlett (Republican) 55.68%
Preston J. Moore (Democratic) 43.75%
Harry E. Ingram (Independent) 0.57%
[43]
Oregon Mark Hatfield Republican Term-limited, Republican victory Tom McCall (Republican) 55.26%
Robert W. Straub (Democratic) 44.67%
Others 0.07%
[44]
Pennsylvania William Scranton Republican Term-limited, Republican victory Raymond P. Shafer (Republican) 52.10%
Milton J. Shapp (Democratic) 46.13%
Edward S. Swartz (Constitutional) 1.41%
George S. Taylor (Socialist Labor) 0.36%
[45]
Rhode Island John Chafee Republican Re-elected, 63.30% Horace E. Hobbs (Democratic) 36.70%[46]
South Carolina Robert Evander McNair Democratic Elected to a full term, 58.16% Joseph O. Rogers, Jr. (Republican) 41.84%[47]
South Dakota Nils Boe Republican Re-elected, 57.71% Robert Chamberlin (Democratic) 42.29%[48]
Tennessee Frank G. Clement Democratic Term-limited, Democratic victory Buford Ellington (Democratic) 81.22%
H.L. Crowder (Independent) 9.84%
Charlie Moffett (Independent) 7.65%
Charles Gordon Vick (Independent) 1.28%
Others 0.01%
[49]
Texas John Connally Democratic Retired, Democratic victory Preston Smith (Democratic) 56.99%
Paul Eggers (Republican) 43.01%
[50]
Vermont Philip H. Hoff Democratic Re-elected, 57.73% Richard A. Snelling (Republican) 42.26%
Others 0.01%
[51]
Wisconsin Warren P. Knowles Republican Re-elected, 53.51% Patrick J. Lucey (Democratic) 46.09%
Adolf Wiggert (Independent) 0.41%
[52]
Wyoming Clifford Hansen Republican Retired, Republican victory Stanley K. Hathaway (Republican) 54.29%
Ernest Wilkerson (Democratic) 45.71%
[53]

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