World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000

Article Id: WHEBN0017416824
Reproduction Date:

Title: Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Transnational efforts to prevent human trafficking, Ruchira Gupta, Human trafficking, Contemporary Slavery in America
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act
Great Seal of the United States
Other short titles William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act
Long title An Act
To combat trafficking in persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and involuntary servitude, to reauthorize certain Federal programs to prevent violence against women, and for other purposes.
Enacted by the 106th United States Congress
Effective October 28, 2000
Codification
Acts amended 2003, 2006, 2008
Legislative history

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) is a federal statute passed into law in 2000 by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Clinton. The law was later reauthorized by Presidents Bush and Obama. The TVPA has the ability to authorize protections for undocumented immigrants who are victims of severe forms of trafficking [1]

History

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act was subsequently renewed in 2003, 2006, 2008 (when it was renamed the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008). The law lapsed in 2011. In 2013, the entirety of the Trafficking Victims Protection was attached as an amendment to the Violence Against Women Act and passed.[2] There are two stipulations an applicant has to meet in order to receive the benefits of the T-Visa. First, a victim of trafficking must prove/admit to being a victim of a severe form of trafficking and second must be a part of the prosecution of his or her trafficker. This law does not apply to immigrants seeking admission to the United States for other immigration purposes.

Since the law requires the applicant to become part of the prosecution of his or her trafficker, trafficked persons may be fearful of retaliation upon the self or the family and thus serves as a major deterrent to individuals even considering application. The law contains provisions for protection of those who are categorized as victims of human trafficking, primarily for sex, smuggling, and forced labor forms of exploitation.

The TVPA allowed for the establishment of the Department of State's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, which coordinates with foreign governments to protect trafficking victims, prevent trafficking, and prosecute traffickers.[3]

Amendments

Proposed

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ "About Us." U.S. Department of State. Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, n.d. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^

External links

  • Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000
  • INVOLUNTARY SERVITUDE, FORCED LABOR, and SEX TRAFFICKING STATUTES ENFORCED at the Department of Justice
  • National Geographic September 2003 pp 23.
  • List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.