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Vitrified tile

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Vitrified tile

Vitrified tile is a tile produced using vitrification. By this process the tiles created have very low porosity. making it stain-resistant and strong. It is an alternative to marble and granite flooring.

Process

Vitrified Tile is made by baking fine minerals like clay and silica, at extreme high temperatures where the individual grains or particles melt and fuse make a vitreous surface. Thus creating a single mass making them extremely hard with low porosity.

Types

  • Soluble salt vitrified tiles are screen printed and polished.
  • Double charge vitrified tiles are fed through a press that prints the pattern with a double layer of pigment, 3 to 4 mm thicker than other types of tile. This process does not permit complex patterns but results in a long-wearing tile surface, suitable for heavy traffic commercial projects.
  • Full body vitrified tiles have pigment in entire body (thickness) of the tile. This makes chips and scratches less noticeable and make this an ideal choice for high traffic zones, but the process significantly increases the cost.
  • Glazed vitrified tiles (GVT) have a glazed surface. They offer a wide variety of design, art work and surface textures like wood grain, bamboo, slate or stone. This is also an expensive process, but the cost is dropping as digital printing techniques are introduced.
  • Digital

Disadvantages

As a manufactured product, vitrified tiles do not have the natural textures and patterns of marble or granite. Tiles

External links

Tile Vitrified Tile

References

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