World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Wind machine

Article Id: WHEBN0004228409
Reproduction Date:

Title: Wind machine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Saint François d'Assise, Henry MacRae, Dante Symphony, Sound effects, Musical instruments
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Wind machine

Historical wind machine (c. 1900) at the Konzerthaus in Ravensburg, Germany
A modern wind machine during the performance of Vaughan Williams's Sinfonia antartica by Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra in January 2013.

The wind machine (also called aeoliphone) is a friction idiophone, which is a class of instrument which produces sound through vibrations within the instrument itself.[1] It is a specialist musical instrument used to produce the sound of wind in orchestral compositions and musical theater productions.[2]

Contents

  • Construction 1
  • Technique 2
  • Classic works that use the instrument 3
    • External Links 3.1
  • References 4
  • Sources 5

Construction

The wind machine is constructed of a large cylinder made up of several wooden slats which measures approximately 75–80 centimeters in diameter.[3][4] The cylinder body of the instrument rests upon a stand and is typically covered with silk, canvas, or other material which is in a fixed position. A crank handle, used by the player to rotate the cylinder and create the sound, is attached to the cylinder.[5] Another method of construction implements an electric fan, which is fitted with lengths of cane, rather than blades. However, this method is less popular because it does not provide the player with the ability to control the speed of rotation.

Technique

The wind machine is played by rotating the crank handle, which is attached to the cylinder, to create friction between the wooden slats and the material covering that touches the cylinder but does not rotate as the crank handle is turned. This friction between the wood and the material covering creates the sound of rushing wind.[6] The volume and pitch of the sound is controlled by the rate at which the crank is turned. The faster the handle is turned, the higher the resulting pitch and the louder the sound. The slower the handle is turned, the lower the pitch and the softer the volume. The sound of the wind machine can also be controlled by the tightness of the fabric covering the cylinder.[7][8]


Classic works that use the instrument

External Links

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmYoAmFcD3o

An Alpine SymphonyWind Machine Part from Strauss,

wind machine enters at 2:30An Alpine SymphonyStrauss,

References

  1. ^ Baines, Anthony, The Oxford Companion to Musical Instruments, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 104, 173.
  2. ^ Peinkofer, Karl and Fritz Tannigel, Handbook of Percussion Instruments, (Mainz, Germany: Schott, 1976), 16, 172-173.
  3. ^ Peinkofer, Karl and Fritz Tannigel, Handbook of Percussion Instruments, (Mainz, Germany: Schott, 1976), 16, 172-173.
  4. ^ Blades, James, Percussion Instruments and their History, (Westport, CT: Bold Strummer, 1992), 346, 394-395.
  5. ^ Baines, Anthony, The Oxford Companion to Musical Instruments, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 104, 173.
  6. ^ Peinkofer, Karl and Fritz Tannigel, Handbook of Percussion Instruments, (Mainz, Germany: Schott, 1976), 16, 172-173.
  7. ^ Peinkofer, Karl and Fritz Tannigel, Handbook of Percussion Instruments, (Mainz, Germany: Schott, 1976), 16, 172-173.
  8. ^ James Blades and James Holland. "Wind machine." Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Oxford University Press, accessed October 5, 2014, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/30403.
  9. ^ Baines, Anthony, The Oxford Companion to Musical Instruments, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 104, 173.
  10. ^ Baines, Anthony, The Oxford Companion to Musical Instruments, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 104, 173.

Sources

  • The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Musical Instruments, ISBN 1-85868-185-5, p. 109
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.