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Yugoslav krone

Kingdom of Serbs, Croats & Slovenes, 400 Kronen overstamped on a 100 Dinara note (1919).

The krone was a short-lived, provisional currency used in parts of the then newly formed Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes which had previously been part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Banknotes 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4

History

After World War I, Austria-Hungary broke up into many states and its southeastern portion merged with Serbia to form the KSCS. The krone replaced the Austro-Hungarian krone at par on November 12, 1918. It circulated alongside the Serbian dinar in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia with an exchange rate of 1 dinar = 4 kronen. The exact date at which the krone ceased to circulate is unclear, with one source indicating that the krone was still in circulation at the end of 1922.[2]

Banknotes

The 1919 First Provisional Issue of the Yugoslav krone was (very similar to the Banknotes of the Czechoslovak koruna (1919) issued on 1912 Austro-Hungarian banknotes (with a black validating oval overprint) in 10, 20, 50, 100, and 1,000 Kronen denominations.[1] The 1919 Second Provisional Issue contained the same denominations of 1912 Austro-Hungarian notes, but instead of an oval overprint, adhesive stamps were used for validation.[2] The stamps on 10, 20 and 50 kronen were tri-lingual (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), while stamps on the 100 and 1000 krone notes could be any of the three languages.[2]

A brief 1919 dinar issue (1/2, 1, and 5 dinara)[2] was replaced by the Ministry of Finance of the KSCS with a 1919 Krone Provisional Issue ("krone on dinar" notes), which were printed as dinar and overprinted with krone[3] at the ratio of 1 dinar = 4 kronen. Denominations issued were 2, 4, 20, 40, 80, 400 and 4000 kronen on ½, 1, 5, 10, 20, 100 and 1000 dinara.[3] Only the 2 kronen on ½ dinar and 4 kronen on 1 dinar had variants without the overprint. It is as yet ambiguous as to whether the overprinted version was issued before or after.

Notes

  1. ^ Cuhaj, 2010, 1252.
  2. ^ a b c Cuhaj, 2010, p. 1253.
  3. ^ a b Cuhaj, 2010, p. 1254.

References

  • Cuhaj, George S. (2010). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money General Issues (1368-1960) (13 ed.). Krause Publications.  
  • Pick, Albert (1994).  
  • Pick, Albert (1996).  
Currencies of Former Yugoslavia
territory 1918 1920 1941 1944 1992 1994 1995 1998 1999 2002 2003 2007 territory
 Macedonia Serbian dinar
(Kingdom of Serbia)
Yugoslav dinar
(Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1920-1929,
Kingdom of Yugoslavia 1929-1941)
Bulgarian lev Yugoslav dinar
(DF Yugoslavia 1944–1946,
FPR Yugoslavia 1946–1963,
SFR Yugoslavia 1963-1992,
FR Yugoslavia 1992-1999,
Serbia 1999-2003,
Republika Srpska 1994-1998)
Macedonian denar Macedonia
 Serbia   Serbian dinar (Occupied Serbia)     Serbian dinar Serbia
Kosovo Albanian lek
(Kosovo and Western Macedonia)
German mark Euro   Kosovo
 Montenegro Montenegrin perper
(Kingdom of Montenegro)
Italian lira
(Occupied Montenegro)
Montenegro
 Slovenia Yugoslav krone
(State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs)
German Reichsmark Slovenian tolar Slovenia
 Croatia   Independent State of Croatia kuna Croatian dinar   Croatian kuna Croatia
Republic of Serbian Krajina Krajina dinar
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar
(Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina)
Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark Bosnia and Herzegovina
Republika Srpska Republika Srpska dinar Yugoslav dinar
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